doubt

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+ 464 Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt. William Shakespeare


+ 353 Wise men, when in doubt whether to speak or to keep quiet, give themselves the benefit of the doubt, and remain silent. Napoleon Hill


+ 404 Being a father has been, without a doubt, my greatest source of achievement, pride and inspiration. Fatherhood has taught me about unconditional love, reinforced the importance of giving back and taught me how to be a better person. Naveen Jain


+ 306 I feel so much pride to represent my community and be Latino. No doubt about it, above my career and sales being a Latino comes first. Daddy Yankee


+ 368 Either I do not corrupt them, or I corrupt them unintentionally, so that on either view of the case you lie. If my offense is unintentional, the law has no cognizance of unintentional offenses; you ought to have taken me privately, and warned and admonished me; for if I had been better advised, I should have left off doing what I only did unintentionally — no doubt I should; whereas you hated to converse with me or teach me, but you indicted me in this court, which is the place not of instruction, but of punishment.


+ 377 I did not go where I could do no good to you or to myself; but where I could do the greatest good privately to everyone of you, thither I went, and sought to persuade every man among you that he must look to himself, and seek virtue and wisdom before he looks to his private interests, and look to the State before he looks to the interests of the State; and that this should be the order which he observes in all his actions. What shall be done to such a one? Doubtless some good thing.


+ 382 I would rather die having spoken in my manner, than speak in your manner and live. For neither in war nor yet in law ought any man use every way of escaping death. For often in battle there is no doubt that if a man will throw away his arms, and fall on his knees before his pursuers, he may escape death, if a man is willing to say or do anything. The difficulty, my friends, is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding unrighteousness; for that runs deeper than death.


+ 301 The right of a nation to kill a tyrant in case of necessity can no more be doubted than to hang a robber, or kill a flea. John Adams


+ 361 I have no doubt but that the misery of the lower classes will be found to abate whenever the Government assumes a freer aspect and the laws favor a subdivision of Property. James Madison


+ 328 The capacity of the female mind for studies of the highest order cannot be doubted, having been sufficiently illustrated by its works of genius, of erudition, and of science. James Madison


+ 343 And I have no doubt that every new example will succeed, as every past one has done, in showing that religion and Government will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together. James Madison


+ 453 The foregoing history may not be precisely accurate in every particular; but I am sure it is sufficiently so, for all the uses I shall attempt to make of it, and in it, we have before us, the chief material enabling us to correctly judge whether the repeal of the Missouri Compromise is right or wrong. I think, and shall try to show, that it is wrong; wrong in its direct effect, letting slavery into Kansas and Nebraska—and wrong in its prospective principle, allowing it to spread to every other part of the wide world, where men can be found inclined to take it. This declared indifference, but as I must think, covert real zeal for the spread of slavery, I can not but hate. I hate it because of the monstrous injustice of slavery itself. I hate it because it deprives our republican example of its just influence in the world—enables the enemies of free institutions, with plausibility, to taunt us as hypocrites—causes the real friends of freedom to doubt our sincerity, and especially because it forces so many really good men amongst ourselves into an open war with the very fundamental principles of civil liberty—criticising the Declaration of Independence, and insisting that there is no right principle of action but self-interest. Abraham Lincoln


+ 422 Judge Douglas frequently, with bitter irony and sarcasm, paraphrases our argument by saying: "The white people of Nebraska are good enough to govern themselves, but they are not good enough to govern a few miserable negroes!" Well! I doubt not that the people of Nebraska are and will continue to be as good as the average of people elsewhere. I do not say the contrary. What I do say is that no man is good enough to govern another man without that other's consent. I say this is the leading principle, the sheet-anchor of American republicanism. Our Declaration of Independence says: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed." I have quoted so much at this time merely to show that, according to our ancient faith, the just powers of governments are derived from the consent of the governed. Now the relation of master and slave is pro tanto a total violation of this principle. The master not only governs the slave without his consent, but he governs him by a set of rules altogether different from those which he prescribes for himself. Allow ALL the governed an equal voice in the government, and that, and that only, is self-government. Abraham Lincoln


+ 399 Whenever, if ever, he and we can come together on principle so that our cause may have assistance from his great ability, I hope to have interposed no adventitious obstacle. But clearly, he is not now with us — he does not pretend to be — he does not promise ever to be. Our cause, then, must be intrusted to, and conducted by, its own undoubted friends — those whose hands are free, whose hearts are in the work — who do care for the result. Abraham Lincoln


+ 367 Of strange, discordant, and even hostile elements, we gathered from the four winds, and formed and fought the battle through, under the constant hot fire of a disciplined, proud, and pampered enemy. Did we brave all them to falter now? — now, when that same enemy is wavering, dissevered, and belligerent? The result is not doubtful. We shall not fail — if we stand firm, we shall not fail. Wise counsels may accelerate, or mistakes delay it, but, sooner or later, the victory is sure to come. Abraham Lincoln


+ 468 My friend has said to me that I am a poor hand to quote Scripture. I will try it again, however. It is said in one of the admonitions of our Lord, As your Father in Heaven is perfect, be ye also perfect. The Saviour, I suppose, did not expect that any human creature could be perfect as the Father in Heaven; but He said, As your Father in Heaven is perfect, be ye also perfect. He set that up as a standard; and he who did most toward reaching that standard, attained the highest degree of moral perfection. So I say in relation to the principle that all men are created equal, let it be as nearly reached as we can. If we cannot give freedom to every creature, let us do nothing that will impose slavery upon any other creature. Let us then turn this Government back into the channel in which the framers of the Constitution originally placed it. Let us stand firmly by each other. If we do not do so we are turning in the contrary direction, that our friend Judge Douglas proposes — not intentionally — as working in the traces tend to make this one universal slave nation. He is one that runs in that direction, and as such I resist him. My friends, I have detained you about as long as I desired to do, and I have only to say, let us discard all this quibbling about this man and the other man; this race and that race and the other race being inferior, and therefore they must be placed in an inferior position; discarding our standard that we have left us. Let us discard all these things, and unite as one people throughout this land, until we shall once more stand up declaring that all men are created equal. My friends, I could not, without launching off upon some new topic, which would detain you too long, continue to-night. I thank you for this most extensive audience that you have furnished me to-night. I leave you, hoping that the lamp of liberty will burn in your bosoms until there shall no longer be a doubt that all men are created free and equal. Abraham Lincoln


+ 346 Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt. Abraham Lincoln


+ 377 I am oppressed with a sense of the impropriety of uttering words on this occasion. If silence is ever golden, it must be here, beside the graves of fifteen thousand men, whose lives were more significant than speech, and whose death was a poem, the music of which can never be sung. With words we make promises, plight faith, praise virtue. Promises may not be kept, plighted faith may be broken, and vaunted virtue be only the cunning mask of vice. We do not know one promise these men made, one pledge they gave, one word they spoke: but we do know they summed up and perfected, by one supreme act, the highest virtues of men and citizens. For love of country they accepted death, and thus resolved all doubts, and made immortal their patriotism and their virtue. James A. Garfield


+ 248 The possession of great powers, no doubt, carries with it a contempt for mere external show. James A. Garfield


+ 353 No doubt this great change has caused serious disturbance to our Southern communities. This is to be deplored, though it was perhaps unavoidable. But those who resisted the change should remember that under our institutions there was no middle ground for the negro race between slavery and equal citizenship. There can be no permanent disfranchised peasantry in the United States. Freedom can never yield its fullness of blessings so long as the law or its administration places the smallest obstacle in the pathway of any virtuous citizen. James A. Garfield


+ 345 The swimming hole is still in use. It has the same mudbank. It is still impossible to dress without carrying mud home in one’s inner garments. As an engineer I could devise improvements for that swimming hole. But I doubt if the decrease in mother’s grief at the homecoming of muddy boys would compensate the inherent joys of getting muddy. Herbert Hoover


+ 299 I hope your committee will not permit doubts as to constitutionality, however reasonable, to block the suggested legislation. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 192 The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 266 Indeed, there is an eloquence in true enthusiasm that is not to be doubted. Edgar Allan Poe


+ 231 Indeed, there is an eloquence in true enthusiasm that is not to be doubted. Washington Irving


+ 291 I've experienced a private doubt, something that I've kept deeply inside, and then eventually delivered a piece of work that people responded to with huge enthusiasm. Trevor Nunn


+ 338 Nature shows us only the tail of the lion. But there is no doubt in my mind that the lion belongs with it even if he cannot reveal himself to the eye all at once because of his huge dimension. Albert Einstein


+ 432 It has often been said, and certainly not without justification, that the man of science is a poor philosopher. Why then should it not be the right thing for the physicist to let the philosopher do the philosophizing? Such might indeed be the right thing to do at a time when the physicist believes he has at his disposal a rigid system of fundamental laws which are so well established that waves of doubt can't reach them; but it cannot be right at a time when the very foundations of physics itself have become problematic as they are now. At a time like the present, when experience forces us to seek a newer and more solid foundation, the physicist cannot simply surrender to the philosopher the critical contemplation of theoretical foundations; for he himself knows best and feels more surely where the shoe pinches. In looking for an new foundation, he must try to make clear in his own mind just how far the concepts which he uses are justified, and are necessities. Albert Einstein


+ 348 A religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. Albert Einstein


+ 421 A person who is religiously enlightened appears to me to be one who has, to the best of his ability, liberated himself from the fetters of his selfish desires and is preoccupied with thoughts, feelings, and aspirations to which he clings because of their superpersonal value. It seems to me that what is important is the force of this superpersonal content and the depth of the conviction concerning its overpowering meaningfulness, regardless of whether any attempt is made to unite this content with a divine Being, for otherwise it would not be possible to count Buddha and Spinoza as religious personalities. Accordingly, a religious person is devout in the sense that he has no doubt of the significance and loftiness of those superpersonal objects and goals which neither require nor are capable of rational foundation. They exist with the same necessity and matter-of-factness as he himself. In this sense religion is the age-old endeavor of mankind to become clearly and completely conscious of these values and goals and constantly to strengthen and extend their effect. If one conceives of religion and science according to these definitions then a conflict between them appears impossible. For science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary. Albert Einstein


+ 345 The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in the United States is closely connected with this. Albert Einstein


+ 238 It is better to remain silent at the risk of being thought a fool, than to talk and remove all doubt of it. Maurice Switzer


+ 298 What if I told you 10 years from now your life would be exactly the same. Doubt you'd be happy. So why are you afraid of change? Karen Salmansohn


+ 221 Doubt kills more dreams than failure ever will.


+ 282 Faith and doubt can't live in a heart at the same time. When you feed your faith, you starve your doubt. Pastor Rick


+ 203 When in doubt who will win, be neutral. Swiss


+ 237 I never had any doubts about my abilities. I knew I could write. I just had to figure out how to eat while doing this. Cormac McCarthy


+ 175 When in doubt, blow something up. J. Michael Straczynski


+ 316 Fitzgerald never got rid of anything; the ghosts of his adolescence, the failures of his youth, the doubts of his maturity plagued him to the end. He was supremely a part of the world he described, so much a part that he made himself its king and then, when he saw it begin to crumble, he crumbled with it and led it to death. John Aldridge


+ 221 Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd. Voltaire


+ 378 I do not care to play the part of Monk; I will not play it myself, and I do not choose that others shall do so. But those Paris lawyers who have got into the Directory understand nothing of government. They are poor creatures. I am going to see what they want to do at Rastadt; but I doubt much that we shall understand each other, or long agree together. They are jealous of me, I know, and notwithstanding all their flattery, I am not their dupe; they fear more than they love me. They were in a great hurry to make me General of the army of England, so that they might get me out of Italy, where I am the master, and am more of a sovereign than commander of an army. They will see how things go on when I am not there. I am leaving Berthier, but he is not fit for the chief command, and, I predict, will only make blunders. As for myself, my dear Miot, I may inform you, I can no longer obey; I have tasted command, and I cannot give it up. I have made up my mind, if I cannot be master I shall leave France; I do not choose to have done so much for her and then hand her over to lawyers. Napoleon


+ 236 Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his twin brother. Khalil Gibran


+ 341 There must be no barriers to freedom of inquiry ... There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors. Our political life is also predicated on openness. We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it and that the only way to detect it is to be free to inquire. And we know that as long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost, and science can never regress. Robert Oppenheimer


+ 241 Without doubt, machinery has greatly increased the number of well-to-do idlers. Karl Marx


+ 187 Medicine heals doubts as well as diseases. Karl Marx


+ 301 Rabban Gamliel would say: Assume for yourself a master; stay away from doubt; and do not accustom yourself to tithe by estimation. Pirkei Avot 1:16


+ 170 If it doubt, leave it out...


+ 205 Any truth is better than indefinite doubt. Arthur Conan Doyle


+ 256 A traditional rabbi is the man to whom the community and its members turn to rule on what Jewish law requires of them, particularly in cases of doubt. David Novak


+ 239 How can a rabbi not live with doubt? The Bible itself is a book of doubt. Arthur Hertzberg


+ 332 The first Matrix I designed was quite naturally perfect, it was a work of art, flawless, sublime. A triumph equaled only by its monumental failure. The inevitability of its doom is apparent to me now as a consequence of the imperfection inherent in every human being. Thus, I redesigned it based on your history to more accurately reflect the varying grotesqueries of your nature. However, I was again frustrated by failure. I have since come to understand that the answer eluded me because it required a lesser mind, or perhaps a mind less bound by the parameters of perfection. Thus, the answer was stumbled upon by another, an intuitive program, initially created to investigate certain aspects of the human psyche. If I am the father of the Matrix, she would undoubtedly be its mother. The Architect


+ 354 When we speak of man, we have a conception of humanity as a whole, and before applying scientific methods to the investigation of his movement we must accept this as a physical fact. But can anyone doubt to-day that all the millions of individuals and all the innumerable types and characters constitute an entity, a unit? Though free to think and act, we are held together, like the stars in the firmament, with ties inseparable. These ties cannot be seen, but we can feel them. I cut myself in the finger, and it pains me: this finger is a part of me. I see a friend hurt, and it hurts me, too: my friend and I are one. And now I see stricken down an enemy, a lump of matter which, of all the lumps of matter in the universe, I care least for, and it still grieves me. Does this not prove that each of us is only part of a whole? For ages this idea has been proclaimed in the consummately wise teachings of religion, probably not alone as a means of insuring peace and harmony among men, but as a deeply founded truth. The Buddhist expresses it in one way, the Christian in another, but both say the same: We are all one. Metaphysical proofs are, however, not the only ones which we are able to bring forth in support of this idea. Science, too, recognizes this connectedness of separate individuals, though not quite in the same sense as it admits that the suns, planets, and moons of a constellation are one body, and there can be no doubt that it will be experimentally confirmed in times to come, when our means and methods for investigating psychical and other states and phenomena shall have been brought to great perfection. Still more: this one human being lives on and on. The individual is ephemeral, races and nations come and pass away, but man remains. Therein lies the profound difference between the individual and the whole. Nikola Tesla


+ 330 Universal Peace, assuming it to be in the fullest sense realizable, might not require eons for its accomplishment, however probable this may appear, judging from the imperceptibly slow growth of all great reformatory ideas of the past. … Our accepted estimates of the duration of natural metamorphoses, or changes in general, have been thrown in doubt of late. The very foundations of science have been shaken. Nikola Tesla


+ 379 It is not a dream, it is a simple feat of scientific electrical engineering, only expensive — blind, faint-hearted, doubting world! . . . Humanity is not yet sufficiently advanced to be willingly led by the discover's keen searching sense. But who knows? Perhaps it is better in this present world of ours that a revolutionary idea or invention instead of being helped and patted, be hampered and ill-treated in its adolescence — by want of means, by selfish interest, pedantry, stupidity and ignorance; that it be attacked and stifled; that it pass through bitter trials and tribulations, through the heartless strife of commercial existence. So do we get our light. So all that was great in the past was ridiculed, condemned, combated, suppressed — only to emerge all the more powerfully, all the more triumphantly from the struggle. Nikola Tesla


+ 290 He declared that it could not be done and did me the honor of delivering a lecture on the subject, at the conclusion he remarked, "Mr. Tesla may accomplish great things, but he certainly will never do this. It would be equivalent to converting a steadily pulling force, like that of gravity into a rotary effort. It is a perpetual motion scheme, an impossible idea." But instinct is something which transcends knowledge. We have, undoubtedly, certain finer fibers that enable us to perceive truths when logical deduction, or any other willful effort of the brain, is futile. Nikola Tesla


+ 296 The evolution of electric power from the discovery of Faraday to the initial great installation of the Tesla polyphase system in 1896 is undoubtedly the most tremendous event in all engineering history. Charles F. Scott


+ 340 There is no doubt that some plant food, such as oatmeal, is more economical than meat, and superior to it in regard to both mechanical and mental performance. Such food, moreover, taxes our digestive organs decidedly less, and, in making us more contented and sociable, produces an amount of good difficult to estimate. Nikola Tesla


+ 126 When you doubt, abstain. Ambrose Bierce


+ 93 There is no doubt that our nation's security and defeating terrorism trump all other priorities. Arlen Specter


+ 79 Doubt is a killer. You just have to know who you are and what you stand for. Jennifer Lopez


+ 101 One who has faith in the inconceivable potencies of the Lord has no doubt that God can do anything. Radhanath Swami


+ 100 Beyond a doubt truth bears the same relation to falsehood as light to darkness. Leonardo da Vinci


+ 103 The Written Torah and the Oral Torah

We receive the written Torah through the most elevated and inclusive conception within our souls. From the midst of our souls, we sense the blaze and beauty of that living, encompassing light of all existence. It makes us soar higher than all logic and intellect. We sense a supernal Godly spirit hovering upon us, touching yet not touching, flying next to our lives and above them, gilding them with its light. This light blazes, sparkles and penetrates everything. It permeates whatever is under the heavens. This great light was not created by the spirit of the Jewish people. Rather, it was created by the spirit of God, the Creator of all. This living Torah is the foundation of the creation of all universes.

With the oral Torah, we descend to life. We feel that we are receiving the supernal light in the second conduit within our soul: the conduit that advances toward the life of action. We sense that the spirit of the nation, bound like the flame to the coal with the light of the true Torah, has, with its unique character, fashioned the unique form of the oral Torah. Without a doubt, this Torah of man is encompassed within the Torah of God. It too is the Torah of God. It cannot be that this flow of life through all portals could be hidden from the keen eye of [Moses, who received this Torah,] who gazed through the clear lens, who was trusted in all the house of God. As the sages stated, whatever a thoughtful student will one day conceive of was told to Moses on Sinai.

These two lights make one complete world, in which heaven and earth are nourished.

Orot Hatorah 1:1


+ 130 He had only one major publication. It was in Hebrew; had no references; wasn't published in an academic journal; and some doubt he wrote it himself. He may have created the world, but what has he done since? The scientific community cannot replicate his results. He never received permission from the ethics board to use human subjects. When one experiment went awry, he tried to cover it up by drowning the subjects. He rarely came to class; telling the students to, "Read the book." Some say he had his son teach the class. He expelled his first two students. His office hours were irregular and sometimes held on a mountain top. Although there were only ten requirements, most students failed.


+ 82 God’s Law on mount Sinai. God's Law on mount Sinai Mankind on Earth is of the opinion that the word “impossible” applies to a lot of things. – We hold a different opinion, because the things we regard utopia to day, may be possible tomorrow. There are therefore practically no utopias. If one had told people 4,000 years ago about all the things you have today, one would have regarded all of this without exception as impossible. Utopias have become reality. Today’s generation’s fantasies are certainly realisable. This is why we absolutely cannot understand why one doubts our existence. Why can’t one comprehend that we travel beyond the speed of light? – Why does one doubt the possibility that dematerialisation exists? There is no utopia. Everything is possible, if one knows the way to realise it. It isn’t for instance utopia that we, respectively our forefathers, brought the LAW of HEAVEN down to Earth. The handing over of the LAW of HEAVEN took place on Mount Sinai. I have indicated details about this once before in the past. If the handing over of this important event didn’t take place conspicuously enough, then it is mainly due to the technological ignorance of the people at that time. What could they have known about spaceships travelling through space? – As far as Moses was concerned, the spaceship was “GOD’S ABODE” and the rest of the crew “HIS ANGELS”. The siren was the “divine trombone” and the ships antigravity was GOD’S promise to “put anyone to death” that crossed a certain line. All of this is so simple and so easy to understand if one is willing to use one’s mind. You have enough technical experience to correctly comprehend the LEGISLATION received on Mount Sinai. There is absolutely no room for doubt here, because any doubt would indicate mental derangement. He, who doesn’t comprehend this plausible LEGISLATION, also does not know how a car is steered and unaware of the energy that moves it. There is however also an evil will that prevents comprehension. Generally speaking, these people are not dumb; there are even some very famous authorities in politics and the sciences amongst them as well as people in the field of theology. This evil will is like a blinker for spiritual eyes. People do not want to know the TRUTH, because it perturbs them personally. Atheists doubt GOD’S COMMANDMENTS. They deem it impossible that GOD talked to a human being on Mount Sinai amidst thunder and lightning. God's Law on mount SinaiThe Israelites saw a fiery cloud moving in front of them. This pillar of fire hovered horizontally. This pillar of fire did not hover vertically as Jewish theology assumes. There is no mentioning of a vertical pillar anywhere. This pillar was one of our spaceships, that is to say, a mother-ship. Their aura of light can still be observed on all our flying objects by you. The material of the spaceships under our control consists of a glass-like mass that is harder than your normal glass. The colour is similar to a Nile-green. The bible describes its appearance as being similar to chrysolite. Antigravity is so powerful that the landing must take place on solid rock. Our spaceships of this size land on Mount Etna or similar mountain these days. So as not to suffer any injuries, the Israelites were advised to stay beyond a boundary, crossing this boundary could be life threatening. A siren of great sound intensity warned the people from crossing the indicated boundary. Moses could only cross this boundary after the gravitational force was switched off. He received an appropriate signal. There was neither thunder nor lightning, only the din of the spaceship and its alternating aura of light. When the antigravity field was switched on, the Israelites fled in all directions filled with fear and terror. Ashtar