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+ 316 Whatever you have, you must either use or lose. Henry Ford


+ 331 There is one quality which one must possess to win, and that is definiteness of purpose, the knowledge of what one wants, and a burning desire to possess it. Napoleon Hill


+ 291 Just do what must be done. This may not be happiness, but it is greatness. George Bernard Shaw


+ 322 The Mobile Web Initiative is important - information must be made seamlessly available on any device. Tim Berners-Lee


+ 310 Most larger companies now see that for the market to grow, Web infrastructure must be royalty-free. Tim Berners-Lee


+ 364 The Mobile Web Initiative is important - information must be made seamlessly available on any device. Tim Berners-Lee


+ 371 Now that mobile phones and the internet have altered the epistemic selective landscape in a revolutionary way, every religious organisation must scramble to evolve defences or become extinct. Daniel Dennett


+ 293 We must always think about things, and we must think about things as they are, not as they are said to be. George Bernard Shaw


+ 195 What must be, must be


+ 350 There can be no greater error than to expect, or calculate, upon real favors from nation to nation. It is an illusion which experience must cure, which a just pride ought to discard. George Washington


+ 353 The Bible and several other self help or enlightenment books cite the Seven Deadly Sins. They are: pride, greed, lust, envy, wrath, sloth, and gluttony. That pretty much covers everything that we do, that is sinful... or fun for that matter. Dave Mustaine


+ 382 Discipline is based on pride, on meticulous attention to details, and on mutual respect and confidence. Discipline must be a habit so ingrained that it is stronger than the excitement of the goal or the fear of failure. Gary Ryan Blair


+ 479 We are all different, but when we ask for the Lord's blessings, we must not forget that God created us equal. Vladimir Putin


+ 267 It's a fine thing to rise above pride, but you must have pride in order to do so. Georges Bernanos


+ 325 Those who desire to rise as high as our human condition allows, must renounce intellectual pride, the omnipotence of clear thinking, belief in the absolute power of logic. Alexis Carrel


+ 327 Must we be put to shame by much smaller and poorer countries, by Ireland, France, Austria or Sweden, who have understood that a nation's support of its arts is a matter of both national pride and cultural survival? Theodore Bikel


+ 240 It's no one's fault to be born ugly, but, honestly, must it be worn as a symbol of pride? Joan Collins


+ 326 Judaism will be enmeshed in pride and shame for as long as it endures. But to endure as a country, Israel must shun both these tendencies. Elizabeth Wurtzel


+ 337 With the pride of the artist, you must blow against the walls of every power that exists the small trumpet of your defiance. Norman Mailer


+ 308 I believe that we must maintain pride in the knowledge that the actions we take, based on our own decisions and choices as individuals, link directly to the magnificent challenge of transforming human history. Daisaku Ikeda


+ 354 All novelists must form their personal pacts in some way with the slowness of their craft. There are some who demand of themselves a 'rate of production,' for whom it's a matter of pride to complete, say, a book every year. Graham Swift


+ 298 Kiwis must not fall behind the standards of other countries. We pride ourselves on our quality of life. Thus we must pave the road in the right way for the future generations. Kylie Bax


+ 275 Workers must participate in progress to enjoy their work and take pride in its product. George W. Romney


+ 284 I hate those men who would send into war youth to fight and die for them; the pride and cowardice of those old men, making their wars that boys must die. Mary Roberts Rinehart


+ 372 The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane. Nikola Tesla


+ 324 If you always put limit on everything you do, physical or anything else. It will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them. Bruce Lee


+ 291 We must remember that a photograph can hold just as much as we put into it, and no one has ever approached the full possibilities of the medium. Ansel Adams


+ 319 A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they do less easily move against him, believing that he has the gods on his side. Aristotle


+ 289 He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god. Aristotle


+ 298 Therefore, the good of man must be the end of the science of politics. Aristotle


+ 224 He who is to be a good ruler must have first been ruled. Aristotle


+ 254 We must no more ask whether the soul and body are one than ask whether the wax and the figure impressed on it are one. Aristotle


+ 304 In making a speech one must study three points: first, the means of producing persuasion; second, the language; third the proper arrangement of the various parts of the speech. Aristotle


+ 235 All religions must be tolerated... for every man must get to heaven in his own way. Epictetus


+ 272 Keep silence for the most part, and speak only when you must, and then briefly. Epictetus


+ 343 No greater thing is created suddenly, any more than a bunch of grapes or a fig. If you tell me that you desire a fig, I answer you that there must be time. Let it first blossom, then bear fruit, then ripen. Epictetus


+ 290 Nothing great is created suddenly, any more than a bunch of grapes or a fig. If you tell me that you desire a fig. I answer you that there must be time. Let it first blossom, then bear fruit, then ripen. Epictetus


+ 214 Men who wish to know about the world must learn about it in its particular details. Heraclitus


+ 261 Men that love wisdom must be acquainted with very many things indeed. Heraclitus


+ 229 Life must be lived as play. Plato


+ 258 Wise kings generally have wise counselors; and he must be a wise man himself who is capable of distinguishing one. Diogenes


+ 266 There must always remain something that is antagonistic to good. Plato


+ 321 If particulars are to have meaning, there must be universals. Plato


+ 247 Must not all things at the last be swallowed up in death? Plato


+ 329 For the introduction of a new kind of music must be shunned as imperiling the whole state; since styles of music are never disturbed without affecting the most important political institutions. Plato


+ 302 If all misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be contented to take their own and depart. Socrates


+ 385 So now, Athenian men, more than on my own behalf must I defend myself, as some may think, but on your behalf, so that you may not make a mistake concerning the gift of god by condemning me. For if you kill me, you will not easily find another such person at all, even if to say in a ludicrous way, attached on the city by the god, like on a large and well-bred horse, by its size and laziness both needing arousing by some gadfly; in this way the god seems to have fastened me on the city, some such one who arousing and persuading and reproaching each one of you I do not stop the whole day settling down all over. Thus such another will not easily come to you, men, but if you believe me, you will spare me; but perhaps you might possibly be offended, like the sleeping who are awakened, striking me, believing Anytus, you might easily kill, then the rest of your lives you might continue sleeping, unless the god caring for you should send you another.


+ 325 If I had engaged in politics, I should have perished long ago and done no good to either you or to myself. ...for the truth is that no man who goes to war with you or any other multitude, honestly struggling against the commission of unrighteouosness and wrong in the State, will save his life; he who will really fight for right, if he would live even for a little while, must have a private station and not a public one.


+ 322 I did not go where I could do no good to you or to myself; but where I could do the greatest good privately to everyone of you, thither I went, and sought to persuade every man among you that he must look to himself, and seek virtue and wisdom before he looks to his private interests, and look to the State before he looks to the interests of the State; and that this should be the order which he observes in all his actions. What shall be done to such a one? Doubtless some good thing.


+ 366 Now the compound or composite may be supposed to be naturally capable of being dissolved in like manner as being compounded; but that which is uncompounded, and that only, must be, if anything is, indissoluble. ...And the uncompounded may be assumed to be the same and unchanging, where the compound is always changing and never the same? ...Is that idea or essence, which in the dialectical process we define as essence of true existence--whether essence of equality, beauty, or anything else: are these essences, I say, liable at times to some degree of change? or are they each of them always what they are, having the same simple, self-existent and unchanging forms, and not admitting of variation at all, or in any way, or at any time?


+ 310 Let us... be careful of admitting into our souls the notion that there is no truth or health or soundness in any arguments at all; but let us rather say that there is as yet no health in us, and that we must quit ourselves like men and do our best to gain health--you and all other men with a view to the whole of your future life, and I myself with a view to death.


+ 293 Then I heard someone who had a book of Anaxagoras, as he said, out of which he read that the mind was the disposer and cause of all... and I said to myself: If mind is the disposer, mind will dispose all for the best, and put each particular in the best place; and I argued that if anyone desired to find out the cause of the generation or destruction of anything, he must find out what state of being or suffering or doing was best for that thing, and therefore a man had only consider the best for himself and others, and then he would also know the worse, for that the same science comprised both.


+ 417 What do you say about making a libation out of this cup to any god? ...I may and I must pray to the gods to prosper my journey from this to that other world--may this, then, which is my prayer, be granted to me. [Then holding the cup to his lips, quite readily and cheerfully he drank off the poison. And hitherto most of us had been able to control their sorrow; but now, when we saw him drinking, and saw too, that he had finished the draft, we could no longer forbear, and in spite of myself my own tears were flowing fast; so that I covered my face and wept over myself, for certainly I was not weeping over him, but at my own calamity at having lost such a companion. Nor was I the first, for Crito, when he found himself unable to restrain his tears, had got up, and moved away, and I followed; and at that moment, Apollodorus, who had been weeping all the time, broke out in a loud cry which made cowards of us all. Socrates alone retained his calmness:] What is this strange outcry? ...I sent away the women mainly in order that they might not offend in this way, for I have heard that a man should die in peace. Be quiet then, and have patience.


+ 343 If I am to live longer, perhaps I must live out my old age, seeing and hearing less, understanding worse, coming to learn with more difficulty and to be more forgetful, and growing worse than those to whom I was once superior. Indeed, life would be unliveable, even if I did not notice the change. And if I see the change, how could life not be even more wretched and unpleasant?


+ 392 We are told that Socrates, though indifferent to wine, could, on occasion, drink more than anybody else, without ever becoming intoxicated. It was not drinking that he condemned, but pleasure in drinking. In like manner, the philosopher must not care for the pleasures of love, or for costly raiment, or sandals, or other adornments of the person. He must be entirely concerned with the soul, and not with the body: "He would like, as far as he can, to get away from the body and to turn to the soul."


+ 215 In order to carry a positive action we must develop here a positive vision. Dalai Lama


+ 338 Today, more than ever before, life must be characterized by a sense of Universal responsibility, not only nation to nation and human to human, but also human to other forms of life. Dalai Lama


+ 222 The ultimate authority must always rest with the individual's own reason and critical analysis. Dalai Lama


+ 308 The time is near at hand which must determine whether Americans are to be free men or slaves. George Washington


+ 307 True friendship is a plant of slow growth, and must undergo and withstand the shocks of adversity, before it is entitled to the appellation. George Washington


+ 265 If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known, that we are at all times ready for War. George Washington


+ 253 A slender acquaintance with the world must convince every man that actions, not words, are the true criterion of the attachment of friends. George Washington


+ 195 Laws made by common consent must not be trampled on by individuals. George Washington


+ 255 There can be no greater error than to expect, or calculate, upon real favors from nation to nation. It is an illusion which experience must cure, which a just pride ought to discard. George Washington


+ 251 I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. John Adams


+ 268 I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. John Adams


+ 263 I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. John Adams


+ 302 Old minds are like old horses; you must exercise them if you wish to keep them in working order. John Adams


+ 289 I must not write a word to you about politics, because you are a woman. John Adams


+ 297 When people talk of the freedom of writing, speaking or thinking I cannot choose but laugh. No such thing ever existed. No such thing now exists; but I hope it will exist. But it must be hundreds of years after you and I shall write and speak no more. John Adams


+ 252 If we can but prevent the government from wasting the labours of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy. Thomas Jefferson


+ 287 The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants. Thomas Jefferson


+ 289 Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind-folded fear. Thomas Jefferson


+ 258 Every citizen should be a soldier. This was the case with the Greeks and Romans, and must be that of every free state. Thomas Jefferson


+ 330 All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression. Thomas Jefferson


+ 246 It is in our lives and not our words that our religion must be read. Thomas Jefferson


+ 232 To penetrate and dissipate these clouds of darkness, the general mind must be strengthened by education. Thomas Jefferson


+ 314 Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear. Thomas Jefferson


+ 318 It is our duty still to endeavor to avoid war; but if it shall actually take place, no matter by whom brought on, we must defend ourselves. If our house be on fire, without inquiring whether it was fired from within or without, we must try to extinguish it. Thomas Jefferson


+ 288 In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. James Madison


+ 215 Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. James Madison


+ 292 Any reading not of a vicious species must be a good substitute for the amusements too apt to fill up the leisure of the labouring classes. James Madison


+ 249 Any reading not of a vicious species must be a good substitute for the amusements too apt to fill up the leisure of the labouring classes. James Madison


+ 271 The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse. James Madison


+ 248 Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. James Madison


+ 242 Our Federal Union! It must be preserved! Andrew Jackson


+ 283 The individual who refuses to defend his rights when called by his Government, deserves to be a slave, and must be punished as an enemy of his country and friend to her foe. Andrew Jackson


+ 302 All the lessons of history and experience must be lost upon us if we are content to trust alone to the peculiar advantages we happen to possess. Martin Van Buren


+ 349 Although in our country the Chief Magistrate must almost of necessity be chosen by a party and stand pledged to its principles and measures, yet in his official action he should not be the President of a part only, but of the whole people of the United States. While he executes the laws with an impartial hand, shrinks from no proper responsibility, and faithfully carries out in the executive department of the Government the principles and policy of those who have chosen him, he should not be unmindful that our fellow-citizens who have differed with him in opinion are entitled to the full and free exercise of their opinions and judgments, and that the rights of all are entitled to respect and regard. James K. Polk


+ 474 I do not believe that our friends at the South have any just idea of the state of feeling, hurrying at this moment to a pitch of intense exasperation, between those who respect their political obligations, and those who apparently have no impelling power but that which a fanatical position on the subject of domestic Slavery imparts. Without discussing the question of right — of abstract power to secede — I have never believed that actual disruption of the Union can occur without blood; and if, through the madness of Northern Abolitionists, that dire calamity must come, the fighting will not be along Mason's and Dixon's line merely. It will be within our own borders, in our own streets, between the two classes of citizens to whom I have referred. Franklin Pierce


+ 274 I speak of the war as fruitless; for it is clear that, prosecuted upon the basis of the proclamations of September 22d and September 24th, 1862, prosecuted, as I must understand these proclamations, to say nothing of the kindred blood which has followed, upon the theory of emancipation, devastation, subjugation, it cannot fail to be fruitless in every thing except the harvest of woe which it is ripening for what was once the peerless republic. Franklin Pierce


+ 229 You have summoned me in my weakness. You must sustain me by your strength. Franklin Pierce


+ 209 The storm of frenzy and faction must inevitably dash itself in vain against the unshaken rock of the Constitution. Franklin Pierce


+ 239 Liberty must be allowed to work out its natural results; and these will, ere long, astonish the world. James Buchanan


+ 338 At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide. Abraham Lincoln


+ 331 But all this even, is not the full extent of the evil. — By such examples, by instances of the perpetrators of such acts going unpunished, the lawless in spirit, are encouraged to become lawless in practice; and having been used to no restraint, but dread of punishment, they thus become, absolutely unrestrained. — Having ever regarded Government as their deadliest bane, they make a jubilee of the suspension of its operations; and pray for nothing so much, as its total annihilation. While, on the other hand, good men, men who love tranquillity, who desire to abide by the laws and enjoy their benefits, who would gladly spill their blood in the defense of their country, seeing their property destroyed, their families insulted, and their lives endangered, their persons injured, and seeing nothing in prospect that forebodes a change for the better, become tired of and disgusted with a government that offers them no protection, and are not much averse to a change in which they imagine they have nothing to lose. Thus, then, by the operation of this mobocratic spirit which all must admit is now abroad in the land, the strongest bulwark of any government, and particularly of those constituted like ours, may effectually be broken down and destroyed—I mean the attachment of the people. Abraham Lincoln


+ 414 I mean the powerful influence which the interesting scenes of the Revolution had upon the passions of the people as distinguished from their judgment. By this influence, the jealousy, envy, and avarice incident to our nature and so common to a state of peace, prosperity, and conscious strength, were for the time in a great measure smothered and rendered inactive, while the deep-rooted principles of hate, and the powerful motive of revenge, instead of being turned against each other, were directed exclusively against the British nation. And thus, from the force of circumstances, the basest principles of our nature, were either made to lie dormant, or to become the active agents in the advancement of the noblest cause — that of establishing and maintaining civil and religious liberty. But this state of feeling must fade, is fading, has faded, with the circumstances that produced it. I do not mean to say that the scenes of the Revolution are now or ever will be entirely forgotten, but that, like everything else, they must fade upon the memory of the world, and grow more and more dim by the lapse of time. In history, we hope, they will be read of, and recounted, so long as the Bible shall be read; but even granting that they will, their influence cannot be what it heretofore has been. Even then they cannot be so universally known nor so vividly felt as they were by the generation just gone to rest. At the close of that struggle, nearly every adult male had been a participator in some of its scenes. The consequence was that of those scenes, in the form of a husband, a father, a son, or a brother, a living history was to be found in every family—a history bearing the indubitable testimonies of its own authenticity, in the limbs mangled, in the scars of wounds received, in the midst of the very scenes related—a history, too, that could be read and understood alike by all, the wise and the ignorant, the learned and the unlearned. But those histories are gone. They can be read no more forever. They were a fortress of strength; but what invading foeman could never do, the silent artillery of time has done—the leveling of its walls. They are gone. They were a forest of giant oaks; but the all-restless hurricane has swept over them, and left only here and there a lonely trunk, despoiled of its verdure, shorn of its foliage, unshading and unshaded, to murmur in a few more gentle breezes, and to combat with its mutilated limbs a few more ruder storms, then to sink and be no more. They were pillars of the temple of liberty; and now that they have crumbled away that temple must fall unless we, their descendants, supply their places with other pillars, hewn from the solid quarry of sober reason. Abraham Lincoln


+ 388 Passion has helped us; but can do so no more. It will in future be our enemy. Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason, must furnish all the materials for our future support and defence. — Let those materials be moulded into general intelligence, sound morality, and in particular, a reverence for the constitution and laws: and, that we improved to the last; that we remained free to the last; that we revered his name to the last; that, during his long sleep, we permitted no hostile foot to pass over or desecrate his resting place; shall be that which to learn the last trump shall awaken our WASHINGTON. Upon these let the proud fabric of freedom rest, as the rock of its basis; and as truly as has been said of the only greater institution, "the gates of hell shall not prevail against it". Abraham Lincoln


+ 309 I am now the most miserable man living. If what I feel were equally distributed to the whole human family, there would not be one cheerful face on the earth. Whether I shall ever be better I can not tell; I awfully forebode I shall not. To remain as I am is impossible; I must die or be better, it appears to me. Abraham Lincoln


+ 345 For several years past the revenues of the government have been unequal to its expenditures, and consequently loan after loan, sometimes direct and sometimes indirect in form, has been resorted to. By this means a new national debt has been created, and is still growing on us with a rapidity fearful to contemplate—a rapidity only reasonably to be expected in a time of war. This state of things has been produced by a prevailing unwillingness either to increase the tariff or resort to direct taxation. But the one or the other must come. Coming expenditures must be met, and the present debt must be paid; and money cannot always be borrowed for these objects. The system of loans is but temporary in its nature, and must soon explode. It is a system not only ruinous while it lasts, but one that must soon fail and leave us destitute. As an individual who undertakes to live by borrowing soon finds his original means devoured by interest, and, next, no one left to borrow from, so must it be with a government. We repeat, then, that a tariff sufficient for revenue, or a direct tax, must soon be resorted to; and, indeed, we believe this alternative is now denied by no one. Abraham Lincoln


+ 416 Don't interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties. And not to Democrats alone do I make this appeal, but to all who love these great and true principles. Abraham Lincoln


+ 289 Let us discard all this quibbling about this man and the other man, this race and that race and the other race being inferior and therefore they must be placed in an inferior position. Let us discard all these things, and unite as one people throughout this land, until we shall once more stand up declaring that all men are created equal. Abraham Lincoln


+ 327 The principles of Jefferson are the definitions and axioms of free society. And yet they are denied and evaded, with no small show of success. One dashingly calls them ”glittering generalities.” Another bluntly calls them “self-evident lies.” And others insidiously argue that they apply to “superior races.” These expressions, different in form, are identical in object and effect – the supplanting the principles of free government, and restoring those of classification, caste and legitimacy. They would delight a convocation of crowned heads plotting against the people. They are the vanguard, the miner and sappers, of returning despotism. We must repulse them, or they will subjugate us. Abraham Lincoln


+ 298 This is a world of compensation; and he would be no slave must consent to have no slaves. Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves; and, under a just God, can not long retain it. Abraham Lincoln


+ 404 The foregoing history may not be precisely accurate in every particular; but I am sure it is sufficiently so, for all the uses I shall attempt to make of it, and in it, we have before us, the chief material enabling us to correctly judge whether the repeal of the Missouri Compromise is right or wrong. I think, and shall try to show, that it is wrong; wrong in its direct effect, letting slavery into Kansas and Nebraska—and wrong in its prospective principle, allowing it to spread to every other part of the wide world, where men can be found inclined to take it. This declared indifference, but as I must think, covert real zeal for the spread of slavery, I can not but hate. I hate it because of the monstrous injustice of slavery itself. I hate it because it deprives our republican example of its just influence in the world—enables the enemies of free institutions, with plausibility, to taunt us as hypocrites—causes the real friends of freedom to doubt our sincerity, and especially because it forces so many really good men amongst ourselves into an open war with the very fundamental principles of civil liberty—criticising the Declaration of Independence, and insisting that there is no right principle of action but self-interest. Abraham Lincoln


+ 387 Slavery is founded in the selfishness of man's nature — opposition to it, in his love of justice. These principles are an eternal antagonism; and when brought into collision so fiercely, as slavery extension brings them, shocks, and throes, and convulsions must ceaselessly follow. Repeal the Missouri Compromise — repeal all compromises — repeal the Declaration of Independence — repeal all past history, you still can not repeal human nature. It still will be the abundance of man's heart, that slavery extension is wrong; and out of the abundance of his heart, his mouth will continue to speak. Abraham Lincoln


+ 330 Little by little, but steadily as man's march to the grave, we have been giving up the OLD for the NEW faith. Near eighty years ago we began by declaring that all men are created equal; but now from that beginning we have run down to the other declaration, that for SOME men to enslave OTHERS is a “sacred right of self-government.” These principles can not stand together. They are as opposite as God and mammon; and whoever holds to the one, must despise the other. Let no one be deceived. The spirit of seventy-six and the spirit of Nebraska, are utter antagonisms; and the former is being rapidly displaced by the latter. Abraham Lincoln


+ 417 There is a natural disgust in the minds of nearly all white people, to the idea of an indiscriminate amalgamation of the white and black races; and Judge Douglas evidently is basing his chief hope, upon the chances of being able to appropriate the benefit of this disgust to himself. If he can, by much drumming and repeating, fasten the odium of that idea upon his adversaries, he thinks he can struggle through the storm. He therefore clings to this hope, as a drowning man to the last plank. He makes an occasion for lugging it in from the opposition to the Dred Scott decision. He finds the Republicans insisting that the Declaration of Independence includes ALL men, black as well as white; and forth-with he boldly denies that it includes negroes at all, and proceeds to argue gravely that all who contend it does, do so only because they want to vote, and eat, and sleep, and marry with negroes! He will have it that they cannot be consistent else. Now I protest against that counterfeit logic which concludes that, because I do not want a black woman for a slave I must necessarily want her for a wife. I need not have her for either, I can just leave her alone. In some respects she certainly is not my equal; but in her natural right to eat the bread she earns with her own hands without asking leave of any one else, she is my equal, and the equal of all others. Abraham Lincoln


+ 347 Whenever, if ever, he and we can come together on principle so that our cause may have assistance from his great ability, I hope to have interposed no adventitious obstacle. But clearly, he is not now with us — he does not pretend to be — he does not promise ever to be. Our cause, then, must be intrusted to, and conducted by, its own undoubted friends — those whose hands are free, whose hearts are in the work — who do care for the result. Abraham Lincoln


+ 416 My friend has said to me that I am a poor hand to quote Scripture. I will try it again, however. It is said in one of the admonitions of our Lord, As your Father in Heaven is perfect, be ye also perfect. The Saviour, I suppose, did not expect that any human creature could be perfect as the Father in Heaven; but He said, As your Father in Heaven is perfect, be ye also perfect. He set that up as a standard; and he who did most toward reaching that standard, attained the highest degree of moral perfection. So I say in relation to the principle that all men are created equal, let it be as nearly reached as we can. If we cannot give freedom to every creature, let us do nothing that will impose slavery upon any other creature. Let us then turn this Government back into the channel in which the framers of the Constitution originally placed it. Let us stand firmly by each other. If we do not do so we are turning in the contrary direction, that our friend Judge Douglas proposes — not intentionally — as working in the traces tend to make this one universal slave nation. He is one that runs in that direction, and as such I resist him. My friends, I have detained you about as long as I desired to do, and I have only to say, let us discard all this quibbling about this man and the other man; this race and that race and the other race being inferior, and therefore they must be placed in an inferior position; discarding our standard that we have left us. Let us discard all these things, and unite as one people throughout this land, until we shall once more stand up declaring that all men are created equal. My friends, I could not, without launching off upon some new topic, which would detain you too long, continue to-night. I thank you for this most extensive audience that you have furnished me to-night. I leave you, hoping that the lamp of liberty will burn in your bosoms until there shall no longer be a doubt that all men are created free and equal. Abraham Lincoln


+ 381 While I was at the hotel to-day, an elderly gentleman called upon me to know whether I was really in favor of producing perfect equality between the negroes and white people. While I had not proposed to myself on this occasion to say much on that subject, yet as the question was asked me, I thought I would occupy perhaps five minutes in saying something in regard to it. I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races, that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race. I say upon this occasion I do not perceive that because the white man is to have the superior position the negro should be denied everything. I do not understand that because I do not want a negro woman for a slave I must necessarily want her for a wife. My understanding is that I can just let her alone. I am now in my fiftieth year, and I certainly never had a black woman for either a slave or a wife. So it seems to me quite possible for us to get along without making either slaves or wives of negroes. I will add to this that I have never seen, to my knowledge, a man, woman, or child who was in favor of producing a perfect equality, social and political, between negroes and white men. Abraham Lincoln


+ 408 The old general rule was that educated people did not perform manual labor. They managed to eat their bread, leaving the toil of producing it to the uneducated. This was not an insupportable evil to the working bees, so long as the class of drones remained very small. But now, especially in these free States, nearly all are educated -- quite too nearly all, to leave the labor of the uneducated, in any wise adequate to the support of the whole. It follows from this that henceforth educated people must labor. Otherwise, education itself would become a positive and intolerable evil. No country can sustain, in idleness, more than a small percentage of its numbers. The great majority must labor at something productive. Abraham Lincoln


+ 335 All this is not the result of accident. It has a philosophical cause. Without the Constitution and the Union, we could not have attained the result; but even these, are not the primary cause of our great prosperity. There is something back of these, entwining itself more closely about the human heart. That something, is the principle of "Liberty to all"--the principle that clears the path for all--gives hope to all--and, by consequence, enterprize, and industry to all. The expression of that principle, in our Declaration of Independence, was most happy, and fortunate. Without this, as well as with it, we could have declared our independence of Great Britain; but without it, we could not, I think, have secured our free government, and consequent prosperity. No oppressed, people will fight, and endure, as our fathers did, without the promise of something better, than a mere change of masters. The assertion of that principle, at that time, was the word, "fitly spoken" which has proved an "apple of gold" to us. The Union, and the Constitution, are the picture of silver, subsequently framed around it. The picture was made, not to conceal, or destroy the apple; but to adorn, and preserve it. The picture was made for the apple--not the apple for the picture. So let us act, that neither picture, or apple shall ever be blurred, or bruised or broken. That we may so act, we must study, and understand the points of danger. Abraham Lincoln


+ 343 I have scarcely felt greater pain in my life than on learning yesterday from Bob's letter, that you had failed to enter Harvard University. And yet there is very little in it, if you will allow no feeling of discouragement to seize, and prey upon you. It is a certain truth, that you can enter, and graduate in, Harvard University; and having made the attempt, you must succeed in it. Must? is the word. I know not how to aid you, save in the assurance of one of mature age, and much severe experience, that you can not fail, if you resolutely determine, that you will not. Abraham Lincoln


+ 419 Long experience has shown that armies can not be maintained unless desertion shall be punished by the severe penalty of death. The case requires, and the law and the constitution, sanction this punishment. Must I shoot a simple-minded soldier boy who deserts, while I must not touch a hair of a wiley agitator who induces him to desert? This is none the less injurious when effected by getting a father, or brother, or friend, into a public meeting, and there working upon his feeling, till he is persuaded to write the soldier boy, that he is fighting in a bad cause, for a wicked administration of a contemptable government, too weak to arrest and punish him if he shall desert. I think that in such a case, to silence the agitator, and save the boy, is not only constitutional, but, withal, a great mercy. Abraham Lincoln


+ 223 I do not like that man. I must get to know him better. Abraham Lincoln


+ 327 The truth is, that this question is one of national importance, and we cannot help dealing with it: we must do something about it, whether we will or not. We cannot avoid it; the subject is one we cannot avoid considering; we can no more avoid it than a man can live without eating. It is upon us; it attaches to the body politic as much and as closely as the natural wants attach to our natural bodies. Now I think it important that this matter should be taken up in earnest, and really settled. And one way to bring about a true settlement of the question is to understand its true magnitude. Abraham Lincoln


+ 412 No policy that does not rest upon some philosophical public opinion can be permanently maintained. And hence, there are but two policies in regard to Slavery that can be at all maintained. The first, based on the property view that Slavery is right, conforms to that idea throughout, and demands that we shall do everything for it that we ought to do if it were right. We must sweep away all opposition, for opposition to the right is wrong; we must agree that Slavery is right, and we must adopt the idea that property has persuaded the owner to believe -- that Slavery is morally right and socially elevating. This gives a philosophical basis for a permanent policy of encouragement. The other policy is one that squares with the idea that Slavery is wrong, and it consists in doing everything that we ought to do if it is wrong. [...] I don't mean that we ought to attack it where it exists. To me it seems that if we were to form a government anew, in view of the actual presence of Slavery we should find it necessary to frame just such a government as our fathers did; giving to the slaveholder the entire control where the system was established, while we possessed the power to restrain it from going outside those limits. From the necessities of the case we should be compelled to form just such a government as our blessed fathers gave us; and, surely, if they have so made it, that adds another reason why we should let Slavery alone where it exists. Abraham Lincoln


+ 337 There is a falsehood wrapped up in that statement. "In the struggle between the white man and the negro" assumes that there is a struggle, in which either the white man must enslave the negro or the negro must enslave the white. There is no such struggle! It is merely an ingenious falsehood, to degrade and brutalize the negro. Let each let the other alone, and there is no struggle about it. If it was like two wrecked seamen on a narrow plank, when each must push the other off or drown himself, I would push the negro off or a white man either, but it is not; the plank is large enough for both. This good earth is plenty broad enough for white man and negro both, and there is no need of either pushing the other off. Abraham Lincoln


+ 347 You have done nothing, and have protested that you have done nothing, to injure the South. And yet, to get back the shoe trade, you must leave off doing something that you are now doing. What is it? You must stop thinking slavery wrong! Let your institutions be wholly changed; let your State Constitutions be subverted, glorify slavery, and so you will get back the shoe trade -- for what? You have brought owned labor with it to compete with your own labor, to underwork you, and to degrade you! Are you ready to get back the trade on those terms? Abraham Lincoln


+ 248 Do not interfere with anything in the Constitution. That must be maintained, for it is the only safeguard of our liberties. Abraham Lincoln


+ 310 I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live by the light that I have. I must stand with anybody that stands right, and stand with him while he is right, and part with him when he goes wrong. Abraham Lincoln


+ 213 I don't like that man. I must get to know him better. Abraham Lincoln


+ 333 The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. Abraham Lincoln


+ 209 Important principles may, and must, be inflexible. Abraham Lincoln


+ 298 In great contests each party claims to act in accordance with the will of God. Both may be, and one must be wrong. Abraham Lincoln


+ 243 As our case is new, we must think and act anew. Abraham Lincoln


+ 253 Some single mind must be master, else there will be no agreement in anything. Abraham Lincoln


+ 363 At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide. Abraham Lincoln


+ 305 There are some who lack confidence in the integrity and capacity of the people to govern themselves. To all who entertain such fears I will most respectfully say that I entertain none... If a man is not capable, and is not to be trusted with the government of himself, is he to be trusted with the government of others... Who, then, will govern? The answer must be, Man — for we have no angels in the shape of men, as yet, who are willing to take charge of our political affairs. Andrew Johnson


+ 327 I must be permitted to say that I have been almost overwhelmed by the announcement of the sad event which has so recently occurred. I feel incompetent to perform duties so important and responsible as those which have been so unexpectedly thrown upon me. Andrew Johnson


+ 368 The only assurance that I can now give of the future is reference to the past. The course which I have taken in the past in connection with this rebellion must be regarded as a guaranty of the future. My past public life, which has been long and laborious, has been founded, as I in good conscience believe, upon a great principle of right, which lies at the basis of all things. The best energies of my life have been spent in endeavoring to establish and perpetuate the principles of free government, and I believe that the Government in passing through its present perils will settle down upon principles consonant with popular rights more permanent and enduring than heretofore. I must be permitted to say, if I understand the feelings of my own heart, that I have long labored to ameliorate and elevate the condition of the great mass of the American people. Toil and an honest advocacy of the great principles of free government have been my lot. Duties have been mine; consequences are God's. This has been the foundation of my political creed, and I feel that in the end the Government will triumph and that these great principles will be permanently established. Andrew Johnson


+ 319 Our Government springs from and was made for the people — not the people for the Government. To them it owes allegiance; from them it must derive its courage, strength, and wisdom. But while the Government is thus bound to defer to the people, from whom it derives its existence, it should, from the very consideration of its origin, be strong in its power of resistance to the establishment of inequalities. Monopolies, perpetuities, and class legislation are contrary to the genius of free government, and ought not to be allowed. Here there is no room for favored classes or monopolies; the principle of our Government is that of equal laws and freedom of industry. Wherever monopoly attains a foothold, it is sure to be a source of danger, discord, and trouble. We shall but fulfill our duties as legislators by according "equal and exact justice to all men," special privileges to none. Andrew Johnson


+ 374 The life of a republic lies certainly in the energy, virtue, and intelligence of its citizens; but it is equally true that a good revenue system is the life of an organized government. I meet you at a time when the nation has voluntarily burdened itself with a debt unprecedented in our annals. Vast as is its amount, it fades away into nothing when compared with the countless blessings that will be conferred upon our country and upon man by the preservation of the nation's life. Now, on the first occasion of the meeting of Congress since the return of peace, it is of the utmost importance to inaugurate a just policy, which shall at once be put in motion, and which shall commend itself to those who come after us for its continuance. We must aim at nothing less than the complete effacement of the financial evils that necessarily followed a state of civil war. Andrew Johnson


+ 265 As soon as slavery fired upon the flag it was felt, we all felt, even those who did not object to slaves, that slavery must be destroyed. We felt that it was a stain to the Union that men should be bought and sold like cattle. Ulysses S. Grant


+ 251 Treat the negro as a citizen and a voter, as he is and must remain, and soon parties will be divided, not on the color line, but on principle. Ulysses S. Grant


+ 209 If wrinkles must be written upon our brows, let them not be written upon the heart. The spirit should not grow old. James A. Garfield


+ 332 I am oppressed with a sense of the impropriety of uttering words on this occasion. If silence is ever golden, it must be here, beside the graves of fifteen thousand men, whose lives were more significant than speech, and whose death was a poem, the music of which can never be sung. With words we make promises, plight faith, praise virtue. Promises may not be kept, plighted faith may be broken, and vaunted virtue be only the cunning mask of vice. We do not know one promise these men made, one pledge they gave, one word they spoke: but we do know they summed up and perfected, by one supreme act, the highest virtues of men and citizens. For love of country they accepted death, and thus resolved all doubts, and made immortal their patriotism and their virtue. James A. Garfield


+ 271 I must do something to keep my thoughts fresh and growing. I dread nothing so much as falling into a rut and feeling myself becoming a fossil. James A. Garfield


+ 264 Illiteracy must be banished from the land if we shall attain that high destiny as the foremost of the enlightened nations of the world which, under Providence, we ought to achieve. William McKinley


+ 320 If we stand idly by, if we seek merely swollen, slothful ease and ignoble peace, if we shrink from the hard contests where men must win at hazard of their lives and at the risk of all they hold dear, then the bolder and stronger peoples will pass us by, and will win for themselves the domination of the world. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 275 The chief factor in any man’s success or failure must be his own character—that is, the sum of his common sense, his courage, his virile energy and capacity. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 253 A healthy republican government must rest upon individuals, not upon classes or sections. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 327 In every civilized society property rights must be carefully safeguarded; ordinarily, and in the great majority of cases, human rights and property rights are fundamentally and in the long run identical; but when it clearly appears that there is a real conflict between them, human rights must have the upper hand, for property belongs to man and not man to property. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 204 The greatest doer must also be a great dreamer. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 314 To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 303 Our words must be judged by our deeds; and in striving for a lofty ideal we must use practical methods; and if we cannot attain all at one leap, we must advance towards it step by step, reasonably content so long as we do actually make some progress in the right direction. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 238 We cannot afford weakly to blind ourselves to the actual conflict which faces us today. The issue is joined, and we must fight or fail. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 270 Our government, National and State, must be freed from the sinister influence or control of special interests. [...] now the great special business interests too often control and corrupt the men and methods of government for their own profit. We must drive the special interests out of politics. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 266 The Constitution guarantees protection to property, and we must make that promise good. But it does not give the right of suffrage to any corporation. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 299 Whenever the alternative must be faced, I am for men and not for property ... . I am far from underestimating the importance of dividends; but I rank dividends below human character. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 259 We must apply new political methods to meet the new political needs, or else we shall stiffer, and our children also. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 363 We demand that big business give the people a square deal; in return we must insist that when any one engaged in big business honestly endeavors to do right he shall himself be given a square deal; and the first, and most elementary, kind of square deal is to give him in advance full information as to just what he can, and what he cannot, legally and properly do. It is absurd, and much worse than absurd, to treat the deliberate lawbreaker as on an exact par with the man eager to obey the law, whose only desire is to find out from some competent Governmental authority what the law is, and then to live up to it. Moreover, it is absurd to treat the size of a corporation as in itself a crime. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 291 Americanism is a matter of the spirit and of the soul. Our allegiance must be purely to the United States. We must unsparingly condemn any man who holds any other allegiance. But if he is heartily and singly loyal to this Republic, then no matter where he was born, he is just as good an American as anyone else. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 225 The immigrant must not be allowed to drift or to be put at the mercy of the exploiter. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 368 As a people we must be united. If we are not united we shall slip into the gulf of measureless disaster. We must be strong in purpose for our own defense and bent on securing justice within our borders. If as a nation we are split into warring camps, if we teach our citizens not to look upon one another as brothers but as enemies divided by the hatred of creed for creed or of those of one race against those of another race, surely we shall fail and our great democratic experiment on this continent will go down in crushing overthrow. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 280 All of us, no matter from what land our parents came, no matter in what way we may severally worship our Creator, must stand shoulder to shoulder in a united America for the elimination of race and religious prejudice. We must stand for a reign of equal justice to both big and small. Theodore Roosevelt


+ 226 The supreme test of the nation has come. We must all speak, act, and serve together! Woodrow Wilson


+ 264 A colored man is precisely as much entitled to submit his candidacy in a party primary, as is any other citizen. The decision must be made by the constituents to whom he offers himself, and by nobody else. Calvin Coolidge


+ 331 I have... instituted systematic, voluntary measures of cooperation with the business institutions and with State and municipal authorities to make certain that fundamental businesses of the country shall continue as usual, that wages and therefore consuming power shall not be reduced, and that a special effort shall be made to expand construction work in order to assist in equalizing other deficits in employment... I am convinced that through these measures we have reestablished confidence. Wages should remain stable. A very large degree of industrial unemployment and suffering which would otherwise have occurred has been prevented. Agricultural prices have reflected the returning confidence. The measures taken must be vigorously pursued until normal conditions are restored. Herbert Hoover


+ 322 If, by the grace of God, we have passed the worst of this storm, the future months will be easy. If we shall be called upon to endure more of this period, we must gird ourselves for even greater effort, for today we are writing the introduction to the future history of civilization in America. The question is whether that history shall be written in terms of individual responsibility, and the capacity of the Nation for voluntary cooperative action, or whether it shall be written in terms of futile attempt to cure poverty by the enactment of law, instead of the maintained and protected initiative of our people. Herbert Hoover


+ 221 Older men declare war. But it is youth that must fight and die. Herbert Hoover


+ 239 Older men declare war. But it is youth that must fight and die. And it is youth who must inherit the tribulation, the sorrow and the triumphs that are the aftermath of war. Herbert Hoover


+ 310 Let me make it clear that I do not assert that a President and the Congress must on all points agree with each other at all times. Many times in history there has been complete disagreement between the two branches of the Government, and in these disagreements sometimes the Congress has won and sometimes the President has won. But during the Administration of the present President we have had neither agreement nor a clear-cut battle. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 269 If the country is to flourish, capital must be invested in enterprise. But those who seek to draw upon other people's money must be wholly candid regarding the facts on which the investor's judgment is asked. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 319 Enlightened business is learning that competition ought not to cause bad social consequences which inevitably react upon the profits of business itself. All but the hopelessly reactionary will agree that to conserve our primary resources of man power, government must have some control over maximum hours, minimum wages, the evil of child labor and the exploitation of unorganized labor. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 361 Freedom to learn is the first necessity of guaranteeing that man himself shall be self-reliant enough to be free. Such things did not need as much emphasis a generation ago, but when the clock of civilization can be turned back by burning libraries, by exiling scientists, artists, musicians, writers and teachers; by disbursing universities, and by censoring news and literature and art; an added burden, an added burden is placed on those countries where the courts of free thought and free learning still burn bright. If the fires of freedom and civil liberties burn low in other lands they must be made brighter in our own. If in other lands the press and books and literature of all kinds are censored, we must redouble our efforts here to keep them free. If in other lands the eternal truths of the past are threatened by intolerance we must provide a safe place for their perpetuation. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 287 If civilization is to survive, we must cultivate the science of human relationships - the ability of all peoples, of all kinds, to live together, in the same world at peace. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 274 Competition has been shown to be useful up to a certain point and no further, but cooperation, which is the thing we must strive for today, begins where competition leaves off. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 265 But while they prate of economic laws, men and women are starving. We must lay hold of the fact that economic laws are not made by nature. They are made by human beings. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 242 We must lay hold of the fact that economic laws are not made by nature. They are made by human beings. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 203 To reach a port, we must sail - sail, not tie at anchor - sail, not drift. Franklin D. Roosevelt


+ 283 In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. Dwight D. Eisenhower


+ 265 This world of ours... must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate, and be, instead, a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect. Dwight D. Eisenhower


+ 251 Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in the blood of his followers and the sacrifices of his friends. Dwight D. Eisenhower


+ 228 Together we must learn how to compose differences, not with arms, but with intellect and decent purpose. Dwight D. Eisenhower


+ 237 We must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. Dwight D. Eisenhower


+ 209 We must use time as a tool, not as a couch. John F. Kennedy


+ 274 Freedom of information is so vital that only the national security, not the desire of public officials or private citizens, should determine when it must be restricted. Lyndon Baines Johnson


+ 250 If you want to make beautiful music, you must play the black and the white notes together. Richard M. Nixon


+ 319 You must never be satisfied with losing. You must get angry, terribly angry, about losing. But the mark of the good loser is that he takes his anger out on himself and not his victorious opponents or on his teammates. Richard M. Nixon


+ 279 We must always remember that America is a great nation today not because of what government did for people but because of what people did for themselves and for one another. Richard M. Nixon


+ 284 A public man must never forget that he loses his usefulness when he as an individual, rather than his policy, becomes the issue. Richard M. Nixon


+ 266 The political lesson of Watergate is this: Never again must America allow an arrogant, elite guard of political adolescents to by-pass the regular party organization and dictate the terms of a national election. Gerald Ford


+ 293 Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it on to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free. Ronald Reagan


+ 301 Freedom is a fragile thing and is never more than one generation away from extinction. It is not ours by inheritance; it must be fought for and defended constantly by each generation, for it comes only once to a people. Those who have known freedom and then lost it have never known it again. Ronald Reagan


+ 271 We must act on what we know. I take as my guide the hope of a saint: In crucial things, unity; in important things, diversity; in all things, generosity. George Herbert Walker Bush


+ 206 If you wish to move mountains tomorrow, you must start by lifting stones today.


+ 216 Every production of genius must be the production of enthusiasm. Benjamin Disraeli


+ 254 The most essential factor is persistence - the determination never to allow your energy or enthusiasm to be dampened by the discouragement that must inevitably come. James Whitcomb Riley


+ 274 Faith is an excitement and an enthusiasm: it is a condition of intellectual magnificence to which we must cling as to a treasure, and not squander on our way through life in the small coin of empty words, or in exact and priggish argument. George Sand


+ 287 Religion must completely encircle the spirit of ethical man like his element, and this luminous chaos of divine thoughts and feelings is called enthusiasm. Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel


+ 208 I must have good genes from my parents because I feel no slowdown of energy, enthusiasm or even memory. Nancy Pelosi


+ 244 It is not easy to find something that will intrigue and bind your interest and enthusiasm. This you must seek for yourself. Walter Annenberg


+ 233 Winners must learn to relish change with the same enthusiasm and energy that we have resisted it in the past. Tom Peters


+ 265 Enthusiasm is everything. It must be taut and vibrating like a guitar string. Pele


+ 226 One must be convinced to convince, to have enthusiasm to stimulate the others. Stefan Zweig


+ 203 One must be convinced to convince, to have enthusiasm to stimulate the others. Stefan Zweig


+ 228 It cannot take decades to resurrect, we must act immediately with purpose and enthusiasm to rebuild. Alan Autry


+ 281 Useful as a war against France, undertaken by the Government against the will of the people would be for our revolutionary development, just so dangerous must be the effect upon our democratic development of a war supported by blind popular enthusiasm. Ferdinand Lassalle


+ 273 You must think of yourself as becoming the person you want to be. David Viscott


+ 284 Men do not knowingly drink for the effect alcohol produces on the body. What they drink for is the brain-effect; and if it must come through the body, so much the worse for the body. Jack London


+ 322 The fortunate man is the one who cannot take more than a couple of drinks without becoming intoxicated. The unfortunate wight is the one who can take many glasses without betraying a sign; who must take numerous glasses in order to get the kick. Jack London


+ 329 Truth alone will endure, all the rest will be swept away before the tide of time. I must continue to bear testimony to truth even if I am forsaken by all. Mine may today be a voice in the wilderness, but it will be heard when all other voices are silenced, if it is the voice of Truth. Mahatma Gandhi


+ 338 A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. Jesus Christ


+ 308 To say 'I love you' one must first be able to say the 'I.' Ayn Rand


+ 309 If thou must love me, let it be for naught except for love's sake only. Elizabeth Barrett Browning


+ 269 War has given applied psychology a tremendous impulse. This will, on the whole, do good, for psychology, which is the largest and last of the sciences, must not try to be too pure. G. Stanley Hall


+ 387 The popular medical formulation of morality that goes back to Ariston of Chios, "virtue is the health of the soul," would have to be changed to become useful, at least to read: "your virtue is the health of your soul." For there is no health as such, and all attempts to define a thing that way have been wretched failures. Even the determination of what is healthy for your body depends on your goal, your horizon, your energies, your impulses, your errors, and above all on the ideals and phantasms of your soul. Thus there are innumerable healths of the body; and the more we allow the unique and incomparable to raise its head again, and the more we abjure the dogma of the "equality of men," the more must the concept of a normal health, along with a normal diet and the normal course of an illness, be abandoned by medical men. Only then would the time have come to reflect on the health and illness of the soul, and to find the peculiar virtue of each man in the health of his soul. Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science, § 120 “Health of the Soul”


+ 224 A successful marriage is an edifice that must be rebuilt every day. Andre Maurois


+ 216 If you must have motivation, think of your paycheck on Friday. Noel Coward


+ 233 We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful what we pretend to be. Kurt Vonnegut


+ 252 Why does man kill? He kills for food. And not only food: frequently there must be a beverage. Woody Allen


+ 312 Concern for man and his fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavors. Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations. Albert Einstein


+ 197 In order to be an immaculate member of a flock of sheep, one must above all be a sheep oneself. Albert Einstein


+ 266 To the Master's honor all must turn, each in its track, without a sound, forever tracing Newton's ground. Albert Einstein


+ 288 A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving... Albert Einstein


+ 289 We may assume the existence of an aether; only we must give up ascribing a definite state of motion to it, i.e. we must by abstraction take from it the last mechanical characteristic which Lorentz had still left it. … But this ether may not be thought of as endowed with the quality characteristic of ponderable inedia, as consisting of parts which may be tracked through time. The idea of motion may not be applied to it. Albert Einstein


+ 262 Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein


+ 237 Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance you must keep moving. Albert Einstein


+ 292 Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding. You cannot subjugate a nation forcibly unless you wipe out every man, woman, and child. Unless you wish to use such drastic measures, you must find a way of settling your disputes without resort to arms. Albert Einstein


+ 330 The scientific organization and comprehensive exposition in accessible form of the Talmud has a twofold importance for us Jews. It is important in the first place that the high cultural values of the Talmud should not be lost to modern minds among the Jewish people nor to science, but should operate further as a living force. In the second place, The Talmud must be made an open book to the world, in order to cut the ground from under certain malevolent attacks, of anti-Semitic origin, which borrow countenance from the obscurity and inaccessibility of certain passages in the Talmud. Albert Einstein


+ 379 Why does this magnificent applied science which saves work and makes life easier bring us so little happiness? The simple answer runs: Because we have not yet learned to make sensible use of it. In war it serves that we may poison and mutilate each other. In peace it has made our lives hurried and uncertain. Instead of freeing us in great measure from spiritually exhausting labor, it has made men into slaves of machinery, who for the most part complete their monotonous long day's work with disgust and must continually tremble for their poor rations. ... It is not enough that you should understand about applied science in order that your work may increase man's blessings. Concern for the man himself and his fate must always form the chief interest of all technical endeavours; concern for the great unsolved problems of the organization of labor and the distribution of goods in order that the creations of our mind shall be a blessing and not a curse to mankind. Never forget this in the midst of your diagrams and equations. Albert Einstein


+ 286 Everyone sits in the prison of his own ideas; he must burst it open, and that in his youth, and so try to test his ideas on reality. Albert Einstein


+ 394 Nobody can deny that to-day this foundation of a worthy existence is in considerable danger. Forces are at work which are attempting to destroy the European inheritance of freedom, tolerance, and human dignity. The danger is characterised as Hitlerism, Militarism, and Communism which, while indicating different conditions, all lead to the subjugation and enslavement of the individual by the State, and bring tolerance and personal liberty to an end ... If we want to resist the powers which threaten to suppress intellectual and individual freedom, we must keep clearly before us what is at stake. Without such freedom there would have been no Shakespeare, no Goethe, no Faraday, no Pasteur, no Lister. There would be no comfortable houses for the people, no railways, no wireless, no protection against epidemics, no cheap books, no culture, no enjoyment of art for all. Only men who are free can create the works which make life worth living. Albert Einstein


+ 383 It has often been said, and certainly not without justification, that the man of science is a poor philosopher. Why then should it not be the right thing for the physicist to let the philosopher do the philosophizing? Such might indeed be the right thing to do at a time when the physicist believes he has at his disposal a rigid system of fundamental laws which are so well established that waves of doubt can't reach them; but it cannot be right at a time when the very foundations of physics itself have become problematic as they are now. At a time like the present, when experience forces us to seek a newer and more solid foundation, the physicist cannot simply surrender to the philosopher the critical contemplation of theoretical foundations; for he himself knows best and feels more surely where the shoe pinches. In looking for an new foundation, he must try to make clear in his own mind just how far the concepts which he uses are justified, and are necessities. Albert Einstein


+ 321 Fundamental ideas play the most essential role in forming a physical theory. Books on physics are full of complicated mathematical formulae. But thought and ideas, not formulae, are the beginning of every physical theory. The ideas must later take the mathematical form of a quantitative theory, to make possible the comparison with experiment. Albert Einstein


+ 296 The standard bearers have grown weak in the defense of their priceless heritage, and the powers of darkness have been strengthened thereby. Weakness of attitude becomes weakness of character; it becomes lack of power to act with courage proportionate to danger. All this must lead to the destruction of our intellectual life unless the danger summons up strong personalities able to fill the lukewarm and discouraged with new strength and resolution. Albert Einstein


+ 363 The position in which we are now is a very strange one which in general political life never happened. Namely, the thing that I refer to is this: To have security against atomic bombs and against the other biological weapons, we have to prevent war, for if we cannot prevent war every nation will use every means that is at their disposal; and in spite of all promises they make, they will do it. At the same time, so long as war is not prevented, all the governments of the nations have to prepare for war, and if you have to prepare for war, then you are in a state where you cannot abolish war. This is really the cornerstone of our situation. Now, I believe what we should try to bring about is the general conviction that the first thing you have to abolish is war at all costs, and every other point of view must be of secondary importance. Albert Einstein


+ 298 You cannot simultaneously prevent and prepare for war. The very prevention of war requires more faith, courage and resolution than are needed to prepare for war. We must all do our share, that we may be equal to the task of peace. Albert Einstein


+ 412 The reciprocal relationship of epistemology and science is of noteworthy kind. They are dependent on each other. Epistemology without contact with science becomes an empty scheme. Science without epistemology is — insofar as it is thinkable at all — primitive and muddled. However, no sooner has the epistemologist, who is seeking a clear system, fought his way through to such a system, than he is inclined to interpret the thought-content of science in the sense of his system and to reject whatever does not fit into his system. The scientist, however, cannot afford to carry his striving for epistemological systematic that far. He accepts gratefully the epistemological conceptual analysis; but the external conditions, which are set for him by the facts of experience, do not permit him to let himself be too much restricted in the construction of his conceptual world by the adherence to an epistemological system. He therefore must appear to the systematic epistemologist as a type of unscrupulous opportunist: he appears as realist insofar as he seeks to describe a world independent of the acts of perception; as idealist insofar as he looks upon the concepts and theories as free inventions of the human spirit (not logically derivable from what is empirically given); as positivist insofar as he considers his concepts and theories justified only to the extent to which they furnish a logical representation of relations among sensory experiences. He may even appear as Platonist or Pythagorean insofar as he considers the viewpoint of logical simplicity as an indispensible and effective tool of his research. Albert Einstein


+ 379 A human being is a part of the whole, called by us "Universe", a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest — a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty. Nobody is able to achieve this completely, but the striving for such achievement is in itself a part of the liberation and a foundation for inner security. Albert Einstein


+ 361 It is not enough to teach a man a specialty. Through it he may become a kind of useful machine but not a harmoniously developed personality. It is essential that the student acquire an understanding of and a lively feeling for values. He must acquire a vivid sense of the beautiful and of the morally good. Otherwise he—with his specialized knowledge—more closely resembles a well-trained dog than a harmoniously developed person. He must learn to understand the motives of human beings, their illusions, and their sufferings in order to acquire a proper relationship to individual fellow-men and to the community. These precious things are conveyed to the younger generation through personal contact with those who teach, not—or at least not in the main—through textbooks. It is this that primarily constitutes and preserves culture. This is what I have in mind when I recommend the "humanities" as important, not just dry specialized knowledge in the fields of history and philosophy. Albert Einstein


+ 404 The theory of relativity is a beautiful example of the basic character of the modern development of theory. That is to say, the hypotheses from which one starts become ever more abstract and more remote from experience. But in return one comes closer to the preeminent goal of science, that of encompassing a maximum of empirical contents through logical deduction with a minimum of hypotheses or axioms. The intellectual path from the axioms to the empirical contents or to the testable consequences becomes, thereby, ever longer and more subtle. The theoretician is forced, ever more, to allow himself to be directed by purely mathematical, formal points of view in the search for theories, because the physical experience of the experimenter is not capable of leading us up to the regions of the highest abstraction. Tentative deduction takes the place of the predominantly inductive methods appropriate to the youthful state of science. Such a theoretical structure must be quite thoroughly elaborated in order for it to lead to consequences that can be compared with experience. It is certainly the case that here, as well, the empirical fact is the all-powerful judge. But its judgment can be handed down only on the basis of great and difficult intellectual effort that first bridges the wide space between the axioms and the testable consequences. The theorist must accomplish this Herculean task with the clear understanding that this effort may only be destined to prepare the way for a death sentence for his theory. One should not reproach the theorist who undertakes such a task by calling him a fantast; instead, one must allow him his fantasizing, since for him there is no other way to his goal whatsoever. Indeed, it is no planless fantasizing, but rather a search for the logically simplest possibilities and their consequences. Albert Einstein


+ 324 I am not an Atheist. I do not know if I can define myself as a Pantheist. The problem involved is too vast for our limited minds. May I not reply with a parable? The human mind, no matter how highly trained, cannot grasp the universe. We are in the position of a little child, entering a huge library whose walls are covered to the ceiling with books in many different tongues. The child knows that someone must have written those books. It does not know who or how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books, a mysterious order, which it does not comprehend, but only dimly suspects. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of the human mind, even the greatest and most cultured, toward God. We see a universe marvelously arranged, obeying certain laws, but we understand the laws only dimly. Our limited minds cannot grasp the mysterious force that sways the constellations. I am fascinated by Spinoza's Pantheism. I admire even more his contributions to modern thought. Spinoza is the greatest of modern philosophers, because he is the first philosopher who deals with the soul and the body as one, not as two separate things. Albert Einstein


+ 327 Everything that men do or think concerns the satisfaction of the needs they feel or the escape from pain. This must be kept in mind when we seek to understand spiritual or intellectual movements and the way in which they develop. For feelings and longings are the motive forces of all human striving and productivity—however nobly these latter may display themselves to us. Albert Einstein


+ 322 It is easy to follow in the sacred writings of the Jewish people the development of the religion of fear into the moral religion, which is carried further in the New Testament. The religions of all civilized peoples, especially those of the Orient, are principally moral religions. An important advance in the life of a people is the transformation of the religion of fear into the moral religion. But one must avoid the prejudice that regards the religions of primitive peoples as pure fear religions and those of the civilized races as pure moral religions. All are mixed forms, though the moral element predominates in the higher levels of social life. Albert Einstein


+ 314 The development from a religion of fear to moral religion is a great step in peoples' lives. And yet, that primitive religions are based entirely on fear and the religions of civilized peoples purely on morality is a prejudice against which we must be on our guard. The truth is that all religions are a varying blend of both types, with this differentiation: that on the higher levels of social life the religion of morality predominates. Albert Einstein


+ 402 It is, therefore, quite natural that the churches have always fought against science and have persecuted its supporters. But, on the other hand, I assert that the cosmic religious experience is the strongest and noblest driving force behind scientific research. No one who does not appreciate the terrific exertions, and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer creations in scientific thought cannot come into being, can judge the strength of the feeling out of which alone such work, turned away as it is from immediate practical life, can grow. What a deep faith in the rationality of the structure of the world and what a longing to understand even a small glimpse of the reason revealed in the world there must have been in Kepler and Newton to enable them to unravel the mechanism of the heavens in long years of lonely work! Any one who only knows scientific research in its practical applications may easily come to a wrong interpretation of the state of mind of the men who, surrounded by skeptical contemporaries, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered over all countries in all centuries. Only those who have dedicated their lives to similar ends can have a living conception of the inspiration which gave these men the power to remain loyal to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is the cosmic religious sense which grants this power. A contemporary has rightly said that the only deeply religious people of our largely materialistic age are the earnest men of research. Albert Einstein


+ 391 It is therefore easy to see why the churches have always fought science and persecuted its devotees. On the other hand, I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research. Only those who realize the immense efforts and, above all, the devotion without which pioneer work in theoretical science cannot be achieved are able to grasp the strength of the emotion out of which alone such work, remote as it is from the immediate realities of life, can issue. What a deep conviction of the rationality of the universe and what a yearning to understand, were it but a feeble reflection of the mind revealed in this world, Kepler and Newton must have had to enable them to spend years of solitary labor in disentangling the principles of celestial mechanics! Those whose acquaintance with scientific research is derived chiefly from its practical results easily develop a completely false notion of the mentality of the men who, surrounded by a skeptical world, have shown the way to kindred spirits scattered wide through the world and through the centuries. Only one who has devoted his life to similar ends can have a vivid realization of what has inspired these men and given them the strength to remain true to their purpose in spite of countless failures. It is cosmic religious feeling that gives a man such strength. A contemporary has said, not unjustly, that in this materialistic age of ours the serious scientific workers are the only profoundly religious people. Albert Einstein


+ 388 How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people — first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving... Albert Einstein


+ 356 My political ideal is democracy. Let every man be respected as an individual and no man idolized. It is an irony of fate that I myself have been the recipient of excessive admiration and reverence from my fellow-beings, through no fault, and no merit, of my own. The cause of this may well be the desire, unattainable for many, to understand the few ideas to which I have with my feeble powers attained through ceaseless struggle. I am quite aware that for any organization to reach its goals, one man must do the thinking and directing and generally bear the responsibility. But the led must not be coerced, they must be able to choose their leader. Albert Einstein


+ 301 Today we must abandon competition and secure cooperation. This must be the central fact in all our considerations of international affairs; otherwise we face certain disaster. Albert Einstein


+ 275 The stakes are immense, the task colossal, the time is short. But we may hope — we must hope — that man’s own creation, man’s own genius, will not destroy him. Scholars, indeed all men, must move forward in the faith of that philosopher who held that there is no problem the human reason can propound which the human reason cannot reason out. Albert Einstein


+ 306 But laws alone cannot secure freedom of expression; in order that every man may present his views without penalty there must be a spirit of tolerance in the entire population. Albert Einstein


+ 263 What these blessed men have given us we must guard and try to keep alive with all our strength if humanity is not to lose its dignity, the security of its existence, and its joy in living. Albert Einstein


+ 407 The world needs new moral impulses which, I'm afraid, won't come from the churches, heavily compromised as they have been throughout the centuries. Perhaps those impulses must come from scientists in the tradition of Galileo, Kepler and Newton. In spite of failures and persecutions, these men devoted their lives to proving that the universe is a single entity, in which, I believe, a humanized God has no place. The genuine scientist is not moved by praise or blame, nor does he preach. He unveils the universe and people come eagerly, without being pushed, to behold a new revelation: the order, the harmony, the magnificence of creation! And as man becomes conscious of the stupendous laws that govern the universe in perfect harmony, he begins to realize how small he is. He sees the pettiness of human existence, with its ambitions and intrigues, its 'I am better than thou' creed. This is the beginning of cosmic religion within him; fellowship and human service become his moral code. And without such moral foundations, we are hopelessly doomed. Albert Einstein


+ 315 If we want to improve the world we cannot do it with scientific knowledge but with ideals. Confucius, Buddha, Jesus and Gandhi have done more for humanity than science has done. We must begin with the heart of man—with his conscience—and the values of conscience can only be manifested by selfless service to mankind. In this respect, I feel that the Churches have much guilt. She has always allied herself with those who rule, who have political power, and more often than not, at the expense of peace and humanity as a whole. Albert Einstein


+ 299 Religion and science go together. As I've said before, science without religion is lame and religion without science is blind. They are interdependent and have a common goal—the search for truth. Hence it is absurd for religion to proscribe Galileo or Darwin or other scientists. And it is equally absurd when scientists say that there is no God. The real scientist has faith, which does not mean that he must subscribe to a creed. Without religion there is no charity. The soul given to each of us is moved by the same living spirit that moves the universe. Albert Einstein


+ 308 And the traditional religions worry me. Their long history proves that they have not understood the meaning of the commandment: Thou shalt not kill. If we want to save this world from unimaginable destruction we should concentrate not on the faraway God, but on the heart of the individual. We live now in an international anarchy in which a Third World War with nuclear weapons lies before our door. We must make the individual man aware of his conscience so that he understands what it means that only a few will survive the next war. Albert Einstein


+ 287 You must warn people not to make the intellect their God. The intellect knows methods but it seldom knows values, and they come from feeling. If one doesn't play a part in the creative whole, he is not worth being called human. He has betrayed his true purpose. Albert Einstein


+ 309 The fact that man produces a concept "I" besides the totality of his mental and emotional experiences or perceptions does not prove that there must be any specific existence behind such a concept. We are succumbing to illusions produced by our self-created language, without reaching a better understanding of anything. Most of so-called philosophy is due to this kind of fallacy. Albert Einstein


+ 321 The power of God’s love is great.
We are given this love only once.
It is the most important thing
I must say.
All the rest doesn’t pay.
Alexander Alpeev


+ 256 We simply must do everything we can in our power to slow down global warming before it is too late... The science is clear. The global warming debate is over. Arnold Schwarzenegger


+ 266 The Chinaman is not the issue here, Dudes. The issue is that the Tao Te Ching is the perfect expression of Taoism’s wu wei of life, or in the parlance of Huston Smith, a life of creative quietude in which “the conscious mind must relax, stop standing in its own light, let go” so that it can flow with the Tao or Way of the universe. Dude De Ching


+ 319 A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. Jesus Christ


+ 226 The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. Jane Austen


+ 245 Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving. Albert Einstein


+ 221 For better or worse, you must play your own instrument in the orchestra of life. Dale Carnegie


+ 245 You cannot find your soul with your mind, you must use your heart.


+ 308 Tomorrow is tomorrow. Future cares have future cures, and we must mind today. Sophocles


+ 230 We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful about what we pretend to be. Kurt Vonnegut


+ 201 Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do. Johann Von Goethe


+ 256 To be successful, you must decide exactly what you want to accomplish, then resolve to pay the price to get it.


+ 802 When I arrived in England I thought I knew English. After I'd been here an hour I realized that I did not understand one word. In the first week I picked up a tolerable working knowledge of the language and the next seven years convinced me gradually but thoroughly that I would never know it really well, let alone perfectly. This is sad. My only consolation being that nobody speaks English perfectly.

Remember that those five hundred words an average Englishman uses are far from being the whole vocabulary of the language. You may learn another five hundred and another five thousand and yet another fifty thousand and still you may come across a further fifty thousand you have never heard of before, and nobody else either. If you live here long enough you will find out to your greatest amazement that the adjective nice is not the only adjective the language possesses, in spite of the fact that in the first three years you do not need to learn or use any other adjectives. You can say that the weather is nice, a restaurant is nice, Mr Soandso is nice, Mrs Soandso's clothes are nice, you had a nice time, and all this will be very nice. Then you have to decide on your accent. You will have your foreign accent all right, but many people like to mix it with something else. I knew a Polish Jew who had a strong Yiddish-Irish accent. People found it fascinating though slightly exaggerated. The easiest way to give the impression of having a good accent or no foreign accent at all is to hold an unlit pipe in your mouth, to mutter between your teeth and finish all your sentences with the question: 'isn't it?' People will not understand much, but they are accustomed to that and they will get a most excellent impression.

I have known quite a number of foreigners who tried hard to acquire an Oxford accent. The advantage of this is that you give the idea of being permanently in the company of Oxford dons and lecturers on medieval numismatics; the disadvantage is that the permanent singing is rather a strain on your throat and that it is a type of affection that even many English people find it hard to keep up incessantly. You may fall out of it, speak naturally, and then where are you? The Mayfair accent can be highly recommended, too. The advantages of Mayfair English are that it unites the affected air of the Oxford accent with the uncultured flavour of a half-educated professional hotel-dancer.

The most successful attempts, however, to put on a highly cultured air have been made on the polysyllabic lines. Many foreigners who have learnt Latin and Greek in school discover with amazement and satisfaction that the English language has absorbed a huge amount of ancient Latin and Greek expressions, and they realize that
a) it is much easier to learn these expressions than the much simpler English words;
b) that these words as a rule are interminably long and make a simply superb impression when talking to the greengrocer, the porter and the insurance agent. Imagine, for instance, that the porter of the block of flats where you live remarks sharply that you must not put your dustbin out in front of your door before 7.30 a.m. Should you answer 'Please don't bully me,' a loud and tiresome argument may follow, and certainly the porter will be proved right, because you are sure to find a dause in your contract (small print, of last page) that the porter is always right and you owe absolute allegiance and unconditional obedience to him. Should you answer, however, with these words: 1 repudiate your petulant expostulations,' the argument will be closed at once, the porter will be proud of having such a highly cultured man in the block, and from that day onwards you may, if you please, get up at four o'clock in the morning and hang your dustbin out of the window. But even in Curzon Street society, if you say, for instance, that you are a tough guy they will consider you a vulgar, irritating and objectionable person. Should you declare, however, that you are an inquisitorial and peremptory homo sapiens, they will have no idea what you mean, but they will feel in their bones that you must be something wonderful. When you know all the long words it is advisable to start learning some of the short ones, too. You should be careful when using these endless words. An acquaintance of mine once was fortunate enough to discover the most impressive word notalgia for back-ache. Mistakenly, however, he declared in a large company: 'I have such a nostalgia.' 'Oh, you want to go home to Nizhne-Novgorod?' asked his most sympathetic hostess. 'Not at all,' he answered. 'I just cannot sit down.' . Finally, there are two important points to remember:
1. Do not forget that it is much easier to write in English than to speak English, because you can write without a foreign accent.
2. In a bus and in other public places it is more advisable to speak softly in good German than to shout in abominable English.
Anyway, this whole language business is not at all easy. After spending eight years in this country, the other day I was told by a very kind lady: 'But why do you complain? You really speak a most excellent accent without the slightest English.'
The Language by George Mikes


+ 225 It won't come easy, you must work for it. Stop wishing, start doing.


+ 237 We must all suffer one of two things: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret or disappointment. Jim Rohn


+ 272 Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must. J.W. von Goethe


+ 370 For as long as the power of America's diversity is diminished by acts of discrimination and violence against people just because they are black, Hispanic, Asian, Jewish, Muslim or gay, we still must overcome. Ron Kind


+ 295 Since Hiroshima and the Holocaust, science no longer holds its pristine place as the highest moral authority. Instead, that role is taken by human rights. It follows that any assault on Jewish life - on Jews or Judaism or the Jewish state - must be cast in the language of human rights. Jonathan Sacks


+ 237 Life-writing calls for any number of dubious gifts: A touch of O.C.D., a lack of imagination, a large desk, neutrality of Swiss proportions, tactlessness, a high tolerance for archival dust. Most of all it calls for an act of displacement. 'To find your subject, you must in some sense lose yourself along the way,' is Richard Holmes's version. Stacy Schiff


+ 195 I must be cruel only to be kind; Thus bad begins, and worse remains behind. William Shakespeare


+ 355 Well-matured and well-disciplined talent is always sure of a market, provided it exerts itself; but it must not cower at home and expect to be sought for. There is a good deal of cant, too, in the whining about the success of forward and impudent men, while men of retiring worth are passed over with neglect. But it happens often that those forward men have that valuable quality of promptness and activity, without which worth is a mere inoperative property. A barking dog is often more useful than a sleeping lion. Endeavor to make your talents convertible to ready use, prompt for the occasion, and adapted to the ordinary purposes of life; cultivate strength rather than gracefulness; in our country it is the useful, not the ornamental, that is in demand. Washington Irving, letter to Pierre Paris Irving (nephew), 1824 December 7th


+ 250 To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one's family, to bring peace to all, one must first discipline and control one's own mind. If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him. Buddha


+ 183 No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path. Buddha


+ 221 To live a pure unselfish life, one must count nothing as one's own in the midst of abundance. Buddha


+ 195 The author must keep his mouth shut when his work starts to speak. Friederich Nietzsche


+ 306 I got to thinking about the point in every freelancer's life where he has to decide whether he wants to A, have a social life, and do art in his spare time, or B, do art, and have a social life in his spare time. It has always seemed to me that if you have any hope of making a living as an artist – writer, musician, whatever – you absolutely must learn to tell people to leave you alone, and to mean it, and to eject them from your life if they don't respect that. This is necessary not because your job is more important than anyone else's – it isn't – but because a great many people will think of you as not having a job. 'Oh, how wonderful – you can work whenever you want to!' Well, yes, to a point, but generally 'whenever you want to' had better be most of the time, or else you won't have a roof over your head. Poppy Z. Brite


+ 242 Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world. George Bernard Shaw


+ 249 You must learn to overcome your very natural and appropriate revulsion for your own work. William Gibson


+ 198 To produce a mighty book, you must choose a mighty theme. Herman Melville


+ 281 Usually, when people get to the end of a chapter, they close the book and go to sleep. I deliberately write my books so when the reader gets to the end of a chapter, he or she must turn one more page. When people tell me I've kept them up all night, I feel like I've succeeded! Sidney Sheldon


+ 310 The main question to a novel is - did it amuse? Were you surprised at dinner coming so soon? Did you mistake eleven for ten? Were you too late to dress? And did you sit up beyond the usual hour? If a novel produces these effects, it is good; if it does not – story, language, love, scandal itself cannot save it. It is only meant to please; and it must do that or it does nothing. Sydney Smith


+ 243 He who learns must suffer, and, even in our sleep, pain that cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, and in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God. Aeschylus


+ 243 He that would live in peace and at ease, must not speak all he knows nor judge all he sees. Benjamin Franklin


+ 253 If you would persuade, you must appeal to interest rather than intellect. Benjamin Franklin


+ 296 Sloth makes all things difficult, but industry, all things easy. He that rises late must trot all day, and shall scarce overtake his business at night, while laziness travels so slowly that poverty soon overtakes him. Benjamin Franklin


+ 217 They must often change who would be constant in happiness or wisdom. Confucius, Analects


+ 233 One needs to be slow to form convictions, but once formed they must be defended against the heaviest odds. Mahatma Gandhi


+ 226 Indolence is a delightful but distressing state; we must be doing something to be happy. Mahatma Gandhi


+ 225 You must be the change you want to see in the world. Mahatma Gandhi


+ 225 You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty. Mahatma Gandhi


+ 220 If suffer we must, let's suffer on the heights. Victor Hugo, 'Les Malheureux'


+ 240 Each player must accept the cards life deals him.
But once they are in hand, he alone must decide
how to play the cards in order to win the game.
Voltaire


+ 216 To succeed in the world it is not enough to be stupid, you must also be well-mannered. Voltaire


+ 188 If you wish me to weep, you must mourn first yourself. Horace


+ 291 The day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence. To understand the true nature of the universe, one must think it terms of energy, frequency and vibration. Nikola Tesla


+ 228 For us to GROW in Spirit, it is we who must change - and not the people, places or things around us.


+ 202 We must take responsibility what is in our life.


+ 388 Nothing happens by mistake. The thoughts you think do indeed create your reality. There are two primary forces in the Universe — allowing and resisting. If your manifestation has not yet arrived it is only because you are resisting it. Here is how this works. Imagine driving your car with one foot on the gas pedal and one foot on the brake at the same time. Your car might be moving forward but there will be quite a bit of resistance along the way, not to mention the damage done to the brakes. Most people become frustrated and stop believing in the power of their own thoughts only because they have unconsciously placed great resistance in front of their dreams. Frustration will pull you even more into the negative thinking mode and create more mistrust in the Law of Attraction. Let's say that you desire to have more money. This is a positive thinking manifestation. You are now in a state of creation and allowing. You then might begin to worry about how complicated it will be to have all of this money. You imagine that you won't know how to manage it. Others will want some of it and you might not know how to say "No" to them. Now you are in a state of resistance. Your foot is "sharply pressing down on the brakes" in your "vibrational" world. This is why your creation has not yet arrived. When you are in a state of judgment you are also in a state of resistance. Imagine wanting an expensive new car but you have judgments about those who are able to afford expensive new cars. You are now in a state of resistance. Imagine that you want an easy life where you did not have to work so hard to get by. You keep yourself in a state of resistance when you judge others who already have an easy life where they do not have to work so hard. You can not belong to a club where you despise the current members. If you want your manifestations to arrive you must already be a vibrational match to them. Festering in a state of judgment is just pushing your desires away.


+ 254 What I have done up to this is nothing. I am only at the beginning of the course I must run. Do you imagine that I triumph in Italy in order to aggrandise the pack of lawyers who form the Directory, and men like Carnot and Barras? What an idea! Napoleon


+ 256 The barbarous custom of having men beaten who are suspected of having important secrets to reveal must be abolished. It has always been recognized that this way of interrogating men, by putting them to torture, produces nothing worthwhile. The poor wretches say anything that comes into their mind and what they think the interrogator wishes to know. Napoleon


+ 233 I see that everybody has lost their head since the infamous capitulation of Bail?n. I realise that I must go there myself to get the machine working again. Napoleon


+ 259 Among so many conflicting ideas and so many different perspectives, the honest man is confused and distressed and the skeptic becomes wicked ... Since one must take sides, one might as well choose the side that is victorious, the side which devastates, loots, and burns. Considering the alternative, it is better to eat than to be eaten. Napoleon


+ 255 The people must not be counted upon; they cry indifferently : "Long live the King!" and "Long live the Conspirators!" a proper direction must be given to them, and proper instruments employed to effect it. Napoleon


+ 306 R. Joshua b. Levi met Elijah standing by the entrance of R. Simeon b. Yohai's tomb. He asked him: "Have I a portion in the world to come?" He replied, "if this Master desires it." R. Joshua b. Levi said, "I saw two, but heard the voice of a third." He then asked him, "When will the Messiah come?" — "Go and ask him himself," was his reply. "Where is he sitting?" — "At the entrance." "And by what sign may I recognise him?" — "He is sitting among the poor lepers: all of them untie [them] all at once, and rebandage them together, whereas he unties and rebandages each separately, [before treating the next], thinking, should I be wanted, [it being time for my appearance as the Messiah] I must not be delayed [through having to bandage a number of sores]." So he went to him and greeted him, saying, "Peace upon thee, Master and Teacher." "Peace upon thee, O son of Levi," he replied. "When wilt thou come, Master?" asked he. "Today," was his answer. On his returning to Elijah, the latter enquired, "What did he say to thee?" — "peace Upon thee, O son of Levi," he answered. Thereupon he [Elijah] observed, "He thereby assured thee and thy father of [a portion in] the world to come." "He spoke falsely to me," he rejoined, "stating that he would come today, but has not." He [Elijah] answered him, "This is what he said to thee, To-day, if ye will listen to his voice."


+ 226 If patience is worth anything, it must endure to the end of time. And a living faith will last in the midst of the blackest storm. Mahatma Gandhi


+ 308 I believe that through discipline, though not through discipline alone, we can achieve serenity, and a certain small but precious measure of the freedom from the accidents of incarnation, and charity, and that detachment which preserves the world which it renounces. I believe that through discipline we can learn to preserve what is essential to our happiness in more and more adverse circumstances, and to abandon with simplicity what would else have seemed to us indispensable; that we come a little to see the world without the gross distortion of personal desire, and in seeing it so, accept more easily our earthly privation and its earthly horror — But because I believe that the reward of discipline is greater than its immediate objective, I would not have you think that discipline without objective is possible: in its nature discipline involves the subjection of the soul to some perhaps minor end; and that end must be real, if the discipline is not to be factitious. Therefore I think that all things which evoke discipline: study, and our duties to men and to the commonwealth, war, and personal hardship, and even the need for subsistence, ought to be greeted by us with profound gratitude, for only through them can we attain to the least detachment; and only so can we know peace. Robert Oppenheimer


+ 330 It is with appreciation and gratefulness that I accept from you this scroll for the Los Alamos Laboratory, and for the men and women whose work and whose hearts have made it. It is our hope that in years to come we may look at the scroll and all that it signifies, with pride. Today that pride must be tempered by a profound concern. If atomic bombs are to be added as new weapons to the arsenals of a warring world, or to the arsenals of the nations preparing for war, then the time will come when mankind will curse the names of Los Alamos and Hiroshima. The people of this world must unite or they will perish. This war that has ravaged so much of the earth, has written these words. The atomic bomb has spelled them out for all men to understand. Other men have spoken them in other times, and of other wars, of other weapons. They have not prevailed. There are some misled by a false sense of human history, who hold that they will not prevail today. It is not for us to believe that. By our minds we are committed, committed to a world united, before the common peril, in law and in humanity. Robert Oppenheimer


+ 308 There must be no barriers to freedom of inquiry ... There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors. Our political life is also predicated on openness. We know that the only way to avoid error is to detect it and that the only way to detect it is to be free to inquire. And we know that as long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost, and science can never regress. Robert Oppenheimer


+ 297 The Raelian Movement is an atheistic religion that perfectly merges science and spirituality, and it includes many female priests. Men and women must rise above their previous cultural conditioning and look to the future with a new awareness encompassing beauty and femininity. Rael is the leader of Raelism


+ 368 Elohim Embassy

The Raelian Movement is a non-profit, international organization. It unites those who wish to inform humanity of its true origins and tell people about the very special messages sent by the Elohim, highly advanced extraterrestrial scientists who created life on Earth, including human beings.

But spreading this knowledge is not the only goal of the Raelian Movement. Another primary mission of our organization is to prepare an official embassy to welcome the return of our creators. Through their messenger, Rael, the Elohim have respectfully expressed a desire to come and meet with us. But since they wish to come only if their presence here is welcome, they ask that we first demonstrate our desire to invite them by building an appropriate embassy in advance of their arrival.

That embassy would become the Third Temple as predicted in the ancient scriptures. According to specifications provided by the Elohim, it must be built in a neutral location that has been granted rights of extraterritoriality and guaranteed neutral air space. Providing such an embassy and obtaining the necessary guarantees for the rights of its occupants will prove that humanity is ready for an official meeting with its creators.

Detailed plans and specifications for the requested embassy are available at www.ElohimEmbassy.org

The Raelian Movement recently asked a number of countries to consider hosting the embassy project, and several have indicated an interest in allocating space for such an endeavor. Preliminary discussions are already under way! As shown in the document presented to the various governments approached, the Embassy for Our Fathers from Space will bring substantial financial benefits to the country hosting it. The fortunate nation will also enjoy the special protection of the Elohim and become the spiritual and scientific center of the planet for millennia to come.


+ 239 The writer must earn money in order to be able to live and to write, but he must by no means live and write for the purpose of making money. Karl Marx


+ 212 Men must not shave the hair off the sides of their head — Lev. 19:27


+ 238 Men must not shave their beards with a razor — Lev. 19:27


+ 207 Men must not wear women's clothing — Deut. 22:5


+ 209 Women must not wear men's clothing — Deut. 22:5


+ 201 The Kohanim must bless the Jewish nation daily — Num. 6:23


+ 172 Each male must write a Torah scroll — Deut. 31:19


+ 233 The king must have a separate Torah scroll for himself — Deut. 17:18


+ 226 The court must not inflict punishment on Shabbat — Ex. 35:3


+ 186 Each man must give a half shekel annually — Ex. 30:13


+ 182 Courts must calculate to determine when a new month begins — Ex. 12:2


+ 211 A man must not remarry his ex-wife after she has married someone else — Deut. 24:4


+ 183 The widow must not remarry until the ties with her brother-in-law are removed (by halizah) — Deut. 25:5


+ 245 The court must fine one who sexually seduces a maiden — Ex. 22:15-16


+ 218 The rapist must marry his victim if she is unwed — Deut. 22:29


+ 235 The slanderer must remain married to his wife — Deut. 22:19


+ 209 He must not divorce her — Deut. 22:19


+ 203 A man must not have sexual relations with an animal — Lev. 18:23


+ 220 A woman must not have sexual relations with an animal — Lev. 18:23


+ 206 A man must not have sexual relations with a man — Lev. 18:22


+ 276 The High Priest must not marry a widow — Lev. 21:14


+ 232 The High Priest must not have sexual relations with a widow even outside of marriage — Lev. 21:15


+ 200 The High Priest must marry a virgin maiden — Lev. 21:13


+ 166 A Kohen priest must not marry a divorcee — Lev. 21:7


+ 282 A Kohen must not marry a zonah (a woman who has had a forbidden sexual relationship) — Lev. 21:7


+ 208 A Kohen must not marry a chalalah ("a desecrated person") (party to or product of 169-172) — Lev. 21:7


+ 200 The Nazarite must let his hair grow — Num. 6:5


+ 190 He must not cut his hair — Num. 6:5


+ 190 He must not drink wine, wine mixtures, or wine vinegar — Num. 6:3


+ 199 He must not eat fresh grapes — Num. 6:3


+ 176 He must not eat raisins — Num. 6:3


+ 204 He must not eat grape seeds — Num. 6:4


+ 196 He must not eat grape skins — Num. 6:4


+ 182 He must not be under the same roof as a corpse — Num. 6:6


+ 198 He must not come into contact with the dead — Num. 6:7


+ 202 He must shave his head after bringing sacrifices upon completion of his Nazarite period — Num. 6:9


+ 184 The Levite must set aside a tenth of his tithe — Num. 18:26


+ 183 A non-Kohen must not eat Terumah — Lev. 22:10


+ 186 A hired worker or a Jewish bondsman of a Kohen must not eat Terumah — Lev. 22:10


+ 188 An uncircumcised Kohen must not eat Terumah — Ex. 12:48


+ 192 An impure Kohen must not eat Terumah — Lev. 22:4


+ 190 A chalalah (party to #s 169-172 above) must not eat Terumah — Lev. 22:12


+ 202 A mourner on the first day after death must not eat Ma'aser Sheni — Deut. 26:14


+ 206 The fourth year crops must be totally for holy purposes like Ma'aser Sheni — Lev. 19:24


+ 219 The Kohanim must not eat the first fruits outside Jerusalem — Deut. 12:17


+ 306 The Sanhedrin must count seven groups of seven years — Lev. 25:8


+ 246 The Sanhedrin must sanctify the fiftieth year — Lev. 25:10


+ 236 The Tribe of Levi must not be given a portion of the land in Israel, rather they are given cities to dwell in — Deut. 18:1


+ 207 The Levites must not take a share in the spoils of war — Deut. 18:1


+ 209 The Levites must transport the ark on their shoulders — Num. 7:9


+ 210 The Levites must work in the Temple — Num. 18:23


+ 174 No Levite must do another's work of either a Kohen or a Levite — Num. 18:3


+ 223 The work of the Kohanim's shifts must be equal during holidays — Deut. 18:6-8


+ 226 The Kohanim must wear their priestly garments during service — Ex. 28:2


+ 193 The Kohen Gadol 's (High Priest) breastplate must not be loosened from the Efod — Ex. 28:28


+ 170 A Kohen must not enter the Temple intoxicated — Lev. 10:9


+ 199 A Kohen must not enter the Temple with his head uncovered — Lev. 10:6


+ 191 A Kohen must not enter the Temple with torn clothes — Lev. 10:6


+ 187 A Kohen must not enter the Temple indiscriminately — Lev. 16:2


+ 193 A Kohen must not leave the Temple during service — Lev. 10:7


+ 198 Impure people must not enter the Temple — Num. 5:3


+ 245 Impure people must not enter the Temple Mount area — Deut. 23:11


+ 212 Impure Kohanim must not do service in the temple — Lev. 22:2


+ 225 An impure Kohen, following immersion, must wait until after sundown before returning to service — Lev. 22:7


+ 230 A Kohen must wash his hands and feet before service — Ex. 30:19


+ 224 A Kohen with a physical blemish must not enter the sanctuary or approach the altar — Lev. 21:23


+ 195 A Kohen with a physical blemish must not serve — Lev. 21:17


+ 220 A Kohen with a temporary blemish must not serve — Lev. 21:17


+ 181 One who is not a Kohen must not serve — Num. 18:4


+ 210 The Kohanim must eat the sacrificial meat in the Temple — Ex. 29:33


+ 235 The Kohanim must not eat the meat outside the Temple courtyard — Deut. 12:17


+ 170 A non-Kohen must not eat sacrificial meat — Ex. 29:33


+ 317 The Kohanim must eat the remains of the meal offerings — Lev. 6:9


+ 207 The Kohen Gadol must bring a meal offering every day — Lev. 6:13


+ 231 Each man must count the Omer - seven weeks from the day the new wheat offering was brought — Lev. 23:15


+ 200 An impure person must not eat from sacrifices — Lev. 7:20


+ 227 One who profaned property must repay what he profaned plus a fifth and bring a sacrifice — Lev. 5:16


+ 216 An apostate must not eat from it — Ex. 12:43


+ 190 A permanent or temporary hired worker must not eat from it — Ex. 12:45


+ 202 An uncircumcised male must not eat from it — Ex. 12:48


+ 233 The Kohanim must not eat unblemished firstborn animals outside Jerusalem — Deut. 12:17


+ 213 Every person must bring a sin offering (in the temple) for his transgression — Lev. 4:27


+ 215 The Sanhedrin must bring an offering in the Temple when it rules in error — Lev. 4:13


+ 202 A woman who had a running vaginal issue must bring an offering in the Temple after she goes to the Mikveh — Lev. 15:28-29


+ 228 A woman who gave birth must bring an offering in the Temple after she goes to the Mikveh — Lev. 12:6


+ 241 A man who had a running unnatural urinary issue must bring an offering in the Temple after he goes to the Mikveh — Lev. 15:13-14


+ 220 A metzora (one having a skin disease) must bring an offering (in the Temple) after going to the Mikveh — Lev. 14:10


+ 212 The metzora must not remove his signs of impurity — Deut. 24:8


+ 218 The metzora must not shave signs of impurity in his hair — Lev. 13:33


+ 227 The metzora must publicize his condition by tearing his garments, allowing his hair to grow and covering his lips — Lev. 13:45


+ 200 The metzora must shave off all his hair prior to purification — Lev. 14:9


+ 219 Every impure person must immerse himself in a Mikvah to become pure — Lev. 15:16


+ 215 The court must judge the damages incurred by a goring ox — Ex. 21:28


+ 215 The court must judge the damages incurred by an animal eating — Ex. 22:4


+ 180 The court must judge the damages incurred by a pit — Ex. 21:33


+ 198 The court must judge the damages incurred by fire — Ex. 22:5


+ 222 The court must implement punitive measures against the thief — Ex. 21:37


+ 209 Each individual must ensure that his scales and weights are accurate — Lev. 19:36


+ 208 The court must implement laws against the one who assaults another or damages another's property — Ex. 21:18


+ 201 The court must send the accidental murderer to a city of refuge — Num. 35:25


+ 174 The master must not sell his maidservant — Ex. 21:8


+ 236 Canaanite slaves must work forever unless injured in one of their limbs — Lev. 25:46


+ 217 The courts must carry out the laws of a hired worker and hired guard — Ex. 22:9


+ 220 The worker must not eat while on hired time — Deut. 23:26


+ 246 The worker must not take more than he can eat — Deut. 23:25


+ 184 The courts must carry out the laws of a borrower — Ex. 22:13


+ 190 The courts must carry out the laws of an unpaid guard — Ex. 22:6


+ 207 The creditor must not forcibly take collateral — Deut. 24:10


+ 218 The courts must carry out the laws of the plaintiff, admitter, or denier — Ex. 22:8


+ 220 The court must not execute through a majority of one; at least a majority of two is required — Ex. 23:2


+ 202 A judge who presented an acquittal plea must not present an argument for conviction in capital cases — Deut. 23:2


+ 207 The courts must carry out the death penalty of stoning — Deut. 22:24


+ 213 The courts must carry out the death penalty of burning — Lev. 20:14


+ 213 The courts must carry out the death penalty of the sword — Ex. 21:20


+ 208 The courts must carry out the death penalty of strangulation — Lev. 20:10


+ 205 The courts must hang those stoned for blasphemy or idolatry — Deut. 21:22


+ 194 The court must not let the sorcerer live — Ex. 22:17


+ 225 The court must give lashes to the wrongdoer — Deut. 25:2


+ 223 The court must not exceed the prescribed number of lashes — Deut. 25:3


+ 201 The court must not kill anybody on circumstantial evidence — Ex. 23:7


+ 222 The court must not punish anybody who was forced to do a crime — Deut. 22:26


+ 221 A judge must not pity the murderer or assaulter at the trial — Deut. 19:13


+ 231 A judge must not have mercy on the poor man at the trial — Lev. 19:15


+ 206 A judge must not respect the great man at the trial — Lev. 19:15


+ 208 A judge must not decide unjustly the case of the habitual transgressor — Ex. 23:6


+ 203 A judge must not pervert justice — Lev. 19:15


+ 214 A judge must not pervert a case involving a convert or orphan — Deut. 24:17


+ 201 The judge must not fear a violent man in judgment — Deut. 1:17


+ 188 Judges must not accept bribes — Ex. 23:8


+ 198 Judges must not accept testimony unless both parties are present — Ex. 23:1


+ 190 Anybody who knows evidence must testify in court — Lev. 5:1


+ 196 A witness must not serve as a judge in capital crimes — Deut. 19:17


+ 216 Transgressors must not testify — Ex. 23:1


+ 241 Relatives of the litigants must not testify — Deut. 24:16


+ 229 The High Priest must not defile himself for any relative — Lev. 21:11


+ 295 The High Priest must not enter under the same roof as a corpse — Lev. 21:11


+ 190 A Kohen must not defile himself (by going to funerals or cemeteries) for anyone except relatives — Lev. 21:1


+ 199 The king must not have too many wives — Deut. 17:17


+ 213 The king must not have too many horses — Deut. 17:16


+ 175 The king must not have too much silver and gold — Deut. 17:17


+ 295 He would also say: Do not judge on your own, for there is none qualified to judge alone, only the One. And do not say, You must accept my view, for this is their the majority's right, not yours. Pirkei Avot 4:8


+ 285 Carnage by wild beasts comes to the world for false oaths and the desecration of God's name. Exile comes to the world for idol-worship, sexual promiscuity, murder and the failure to leave the land fallow on the sabbatical year. There are four time-periods when plagues increase: on the fourth and seventh years [of the sabbatical cycle], on the year following the seventh, and following the festivals of each year. On the fourth year, because of [the neglect of] the tithe to the poor that must be given on the third year; on the seventh, because of the tithe to the poor that must be given on the sixth; on the year after the seventh, because of the produce of the sabbatical year; and following each festival, because of the robbing of the poor of the gifts due to them. Pirkei Avot 5:9


+ 308 One who learns from his fellow a single chapter, or a single law, or a single verse, or a single word, or even a single letter, he must treat him with respect. For so we find with David, king of Israel, who did not learn anything from Achitofel except for two things alone, yet he called him his "master," his "guide" and his "intimate," as is stated (Psalms 55:14), "And you are a man of my worth, my guide and intimate friend." Surely we can infer a fortiori: if David, king of Israel, who learned nothing from Achitofel except for two things alone, nevertheless referred to him as his master, guide and intimate, it certainly goes without saying that one who learns from his fellow a single chapter, a law, a verse, a saying, or even a single letter, is obligated to revere him. And there is no reverence but Torah, as is stated (Proverbs 3:35; 28:10), "The sages shall inherit honor" "and the integral shall inherit good"; and there is no good but Torah, as is stated (ibid. 4:2), "I have given you a good purchase; My Torah, do not forsake it." Pirkei Avot 6:3


+ 242 This world is not a jungle. This world is God's Garden. But for a garden to produce good fruit one must work particularly hard... it takes more toil and more time. The Rebbe


+ 207 But if he is caught, he must pay back seven times what he stole, and it may cost him everything he owns. Mishlei 6:31


+ 206 Respect for the Lord will teach you wisdom. If you want to be honored, you must be humble. Mishlei 15:33


+ 283 “Never before have Arabs made a capital in a kind of holy city. Take Saudi Arabia. They have Mecca, Medina, to build their capital there. They took a village called Riyadh and turned it into a capital. The Jordanians had Jerusalem, but they built a capital in Amman and not Jerusalem. I think the Arabs have — the Muslims have great rights in Jerusalem and they must be safeguarded to the tiniest little bit, as the rights of other Christians ... We were there a little earlier. In another four or five years, we celebrate 3,000 years since David the King came and made his capital of the Jewish Kingdom in Jerusalem. When we came back to a unified city after the Six-Day War, we were attacked, we drove them away, the city became one. We didn't touch any of the holy places. We gave freedom of access and freedom of prayer, of course, and freedom of education to every one of the many groups in the city.” Teddy Kollek; Mayor of Jerusalem (1967-1993)


+ 263 You must begin to think of yourself as becoming the person you want to be. David Viscott


+ 302 “If there is a hard, high wall and an egg that breaks against it, no matter how right the wall or how wrong the egg, I will stand on the side of the egg. Why? Because each of us is an egg, a unique soul enclosed in a fragile egg. Each of us is confronting a high wall. The high wall is the system which forces us to do the things we would not ordinarily see fit to do as individuals . . . We are all human beings, individuals, fragile eggs. We have no hope against the wall: it's too high, too dark, too cold. To fight the wall, we must join our souls together for warmth, strength. We must not let the system control us -- create who we are. It is we who created the system. (Jerusalem Prize acceptance speech, JERUSALEM POST, Feb. 15, 2009)” Haruki Murakami


+ 259 What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?" asked the Christian theologian Tertullian... Having received the revealed thruth via Christ, "we want no curious disputation." Well that was then. Today science is so powerful that theologians can't casually dismiss secular knowledge. For most... Athens and Jerusalem must be reconciled or Jerusalem will fall off the map. Philo's thoughtful answer is 'Logos') Robert Wright, The Evolution of God


+ 326 Animals are the lower intelligent of creatures, yet God illustrates man as one of them. Why? To demonstrate to us how careless, how thoughtless, and sometimes how cruel and low-life we can be without him. Without God, we go through a hard, disappointing, and dreadful life. We are like fearful, untrained, and bitter children that have played all day and are afraid to go to sleep at night, thinking we are going to miss out or be left out of things.

A sailor out on a stormy sea needs a strong sail and anchor for the days and a lighthouse for the nights to survive. This is a good illustration of witnessing. We draw from one another’s strength for the day and mediate on it in the nights in accordance with God’s Word.

God has faded out of the mind of this generation, we like immature children, believe that the Toyland of material wealth is a sufficient world. Yet houses, cars, and money really do not fulfill.

Abraham begot Isaac, and Isaac begot Jacob – a generation of God-fearing men. But in the next generation, God was not the God of Isaac. He had faded and became second place in their lives. Even in the mother’s womb, there was a struggle for honor and success. Jacob stole his brother’s birthright. Morals were decaying, rottenness appeared. The same things have happened with us. Our whole nation is reaping the results of a fading faith and trust, which is producing decaying morals and a decaying country. We are morally out of control. Unless we, like Jacob, who when frightened for his life desired a moral renewal, acknowledge that we are wrong and find God in the process.

We must seek God with our whole hearts. The future of this world is in the hands of the believers. God has left everything in the hands of the church. Therefore, we must witness. An evangelical team must go out and bring the people back to the Garden of Eden as God had originally planned. Grace is always available!
Rosa Pearl Johnson


+ 243 American foreign policy has been - and must continue to be - based on unequivocal support for Israel's right to exist and to be free from terror. Howard Berman, Congressman, U.S. House of Representatives


+ 194 We must balance conspicuous consumption with conscious capitalism. Kevin Kruse


+ 263 Proprietary software tends to have malicious features. The point is with a proprietary program, when the users don't have the source code, we can never tell. So you must consider every proprietary program as potential malware. Richard Stallman


+ 222 The changes in our life must come from the impossibility to live otherwise than according to the demands of our conscience not from our mental resolution to try a new form of life. Leo Tolstoy


+ 237 War is so unjust and ugly that all who wage it must try to stifle the voice of conscience within themselves. Leo Tolstoy


+ 204 We must not only cease our present desire for the growth of the state, but we must desire its decrease, its weakening. Leo Tolstoy


+ 208 You are only given a little spark of madness. You must not lose it. Robin Williams


+ 218 You must live for another if you wish to live for yourself. Lucius Annaeus Seneca


+ 219 May be is very well, but Must is the master. It is my duty to show justice without recompense. Lucius Annaeus Seneca


+ 201 Even after a bad harvest there must be sowing. Lucius Annaeus Seneca


+ 182 Every reign must submit to a greater reign. Lucius Annaeus Seneca


+ 192 One must steer, not talk. Lucius Annaeus Seneca


+ 219 It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light. Aristotle Onassis


+ 203 In order to succeed, we must first believe that we can. Nikos Kazantzakis


+ 214 It is strange how often a heart must be broken before the years can make it wise. Sara Teasdale


+ 261 Tomorrow is tomorrow. Future cares have future cures, and we must mind today. Sophocles


+ 182 All things must pass.


+ 253 We all know that Art is not truth. Art is a lie that makes us realize truth at least the truth that is given us to understand. The artist must know the manner whereby to convince others of the truthfulness of his lies. Pablo Picasso


+ 220 We must leave our mark on life while we have it in our power. Karen Blixen


+ 244 No domestic animal can be as still as a wild animal. The civilized people have lost the aptitude of stillness, and must take lessons in silence from the wild before they are accepted by it. Karen Blixen, Out of Africa


+ 276 I'm going to be honest with you. I hate this place. This zoo, this prison, this reality, whatever you want to call it. I can't stand it any longer. It's the smell — if there is such a thing — I feel saturated by it. I can taste your stink and every time I do, I fear I have somehow been infected by it — it's repulsive! Isn't it? I must get out of here. I must get free...and in this mind is the key, my key. Once Zion is destroyed, there is no need for me to be here. Do you understand?! I need the codes, I have to get inside Zion and you have to tell me how. You're going to tell me, or you're going to die! Agent Smith


+ 343 Zion, hear me! It is true, what many of you have heard. The machines have gathered an army and as I speak, that army is drawing nearer to our home. Believe me when I say we have a difficult time ahead of us. But if we are to be prepared for it, we must first shed our fear of it. I stand here, before you now, truthfully unafraid. Why? Because I believe something you do not? No, I stand here without fear because I remember. I remember that I am here not because of the path that lies before me but because of the path that lies behind me. I remember that for 100 years we have fought these machines. I remember that for 100 years they have sent their armies to destroy us, and after a century of war I remember that which matters most... We are still here! Today, let us send a message to that army. Tonight, let us shake this cave. Tonight, let us tremble these halls of earth, steel, and stone, let us be heard from red core to black sky. Tonight, let us make them remember, this is Zion, and we are not afraid! Morpheus


+ 228 I drank too much wine, I must take a piss. Cause and effect. Merovingian


+ 290 Only a human mind could invent something as insipid as love! You must be able to see it, Mr. Anderson! You must know it by now! You can't win! It's pointless to keep fighting! Why, Mr. Anderson?! Why? WHY DO YOU PERSIST?


+ 200 There is some fiction in your truth, and some truth in your fiction. To know the truth, you must risk everything. Neo


+ 212 To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe. Anatole France


+ 296 In the social equation, the value of a single life is nil, in the cosmic equation, it is infinite... Not only communism, but any political movement which implicitly relies on purely utilitarian ethics, must become a victim to the same fatal error. It is a fallacy as naive as a mathematical teaser, and yet its consequences lead straight to Goya's Disasters, to the reign of the guillotine, the torture chambers of the Inquisition, or the cellars of the Lubianka. Arthur Koestler


+ 291 A point of great importance would be first to know: what is the capacity of the earth? And what charge does it contain if electrified? Though we have no positive evidence of a charged body existing in space without other oppositely electrified bodies being near, there is a fair probability that the earth is such a body, for by whatever process it was separated from other bodies — and this is the accepted view of its origin — it must have retained a charge, as occurs in all processes of mechanical separation. Nikola Tesla


+ 287 The scientists from Franklin to Morse were clear thinkers and did not produce erroneous theories. The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane. Nikola Tesla


+ 292 Man's new sense of pity began to interfere with the ruthless workings of nature. The only method compatible with our notions of civilization and the race is to prevent the breeding of the unfit by sterilization and the deliberate guidance of the mating instinct. The trend of opinion among eugenists is that we must make marriage more difficult. Certainly no one who is not a desirable parent should be permitted to produce progeny. A century from now it will no more occur to a normal person to mate with a person eugenically unfit than to marry a habitual criminal. Nikola Tesla


+ 315 When we speak of man, we have a conception of humanity as a whole, and before applying scientific methods to the investigation of his movement we must accept this as a physical fact. But can anyone doubt to-day that all the millions of individuals and all the innumerable types and characters constitute an entity, a unit? Though free to think and act, we are held together, like the stars in the firmament, with ties inseparable. These ties cannot be seen, but we can feel them. I cut myself in the finger, and it pains me: this finger is a part of me. I see a friend hurt, and it hurts me, too: my friend and I are one. And now I see stricken down an enemy, a lump of matter which, of all the lumps of matter in the universe, I care least for, and it still grieves me. Does this not prove that each of us is only part of a whole? For ages this idea has been proclaimed in the consummately wise teachings of religion, probably not alone as a means of insuring peace and harmony among men, but as a deeply founded truth. The Buddhist expresses it in one way, the Christian in another, but both say the same: We are all one. Metaphysical proofs are, however, not the only ones which we are able to bring forth in support of this idea. Science, too, recognizes this connectedness of separate individuals, though not quite in the same sense as it admits that the suns, planets, and moons of a constellation are one body, and there can be no doubt that it will be experimentally confirmed in times to come, when our means and methods for investigating psychical and other states and phenomena shall have been brought to great perfection. Still more: this one human being lives on and on. The individual is ephemeral, races and nations come and pass away, but man remains. Therein lies the profound difference between the individual and the whole. Nikola Tesla


+ 326 A state of human life vaguely defined by the term "Universal Peace," while a result of cumulative effort through centuries past, might come into existence quickly, not unlike a crystal suddenly forms in a solution which has been slowly prepared. But just as no effect can precede its cause, so this state can never be brought on by any pact between nations, however solemn. Experience is made before the law is formulated, both are related like cause and effect. So long as we are clearly conscious of the expectation, that peace is to result from such a parliamentary decision, so long have we a conclusive evidence that we are not fit for peace. Only then when we shall feel that such international meetings are mere formal procedures, unnecessary except in so far as they might serve to give definite expression to a common desire, will peace be assured. To judge from current events we must be, as yet, very distant from that blissful goal. It is true that we are proceeding towards it rapidly. There are abundant signs of this progress everywhere. The race enmities and prejudices are decidedly waning. Nikola Tesla


+ 269 The distance at which it can strike, and the destructive power of such a quasi-intelligent machine being for all practical purposes unlimited, the gun, the armor of the battleship and the wall of the fortress, lose their import and significance. One can prophesy with a Daniel's confidence that skilled electricians will settle the battles of the near future. But this is the least. In its effect upon war and peace, electricity offers still much greater and more wonderful possibilities. To stop war by the perfection of engines of destruction alone, might consume centuries and centuries. Other means must be employed to hasten the end. Nikola Tesla


+ 273 Mutual understanding would be immensely facilitated by the use of one universal tongue. But which shall it be, is the great question. At present it looks as if the English might be adopted as such, though it must be admitted that it is not the most suitable. Each language, of course, excels in some feature.... A practical answer to that momentous question must perforce be found in times to come, for it is manifest that by adopting one common language the onward march of man would be prodigiously quickened. I do not believe that an artificial concoction, like Volapuk, will ever find universal acceptance, however time-saving it might be. That would be contrary to human nature. Languages have grown into our hearts. Nikola Tesla


+ 275 Our senses enable us to perceive only a minute portion of the outside world. Our hearing extends to a small distance. Our sight is impeded by intervening bodies and shadows. To know each other we must reach beyond the sphere of our sense perceptions. We must transmit our intelligence, travel, transport the materials and transfer the energies necessary for our existence. Following this thought we now realize, forcibly enough to dispense with argument, that of all other conquests of man, without exception, that which is most desirable, which would be most helpful in the establishment of universal peaceful relations is — the complete ANNIHILATION OF DISTANCE. To achieve this wonder, electricity is the one and only means. Inestimable good has already been done by the use of this all powerful agent, the nature of which is still a mystery. Our astonishment at what has been accomplished would be uncontrollable were it not held in check by the expectation of greater miracles to come. That one, the greatest of all, can be viewed in three aspects: Dissemination of intelligence, transportation, and transmission of power. Nikola Tesla


+ 255 The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane. Nikola Tesla


+ 236 The trend of opinion among eugenists is that we must make marriage more difficult. Certainly no one who is not a desirable parent should be permitted to produce progeny. Nikola Tesla


+ 207 The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. Richard P. Feynman


+ 201 You were born to win, but to be a winner, you must plan to win, prepare to win, and expect to win. Zig Ziglar


+ 226 The young athlete who aspires to greatness, generally speaking, learns a number of things from several different coaches. The first one taught him the fundamentals; the second one instilled discipline in him and taught him more of the techniques that must be mastered to excel. Zig Ziglar


+ 199 If you want to reach a goal, you must 'see the reaching' in your own mind before you actually arrive at your goal. Zig Ziglar


+ 245 The young athlete who aspires to greatness, generally speaking, learns a number of things from several different coaches. The first one taught him the fundamentals; the second one instilled discipline in him and taught him more of the techniques that must be mastered to excel. Zig Ziglar


+ 197 Success must never be measured by how much money you have. Zig Ziglar


+ 192 When you give directives to a child, especially a teenager, you must consider the nature of your child. Zig Ziglar


+ 155 I must be dreaming.


+ 197 Every one who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science convinced that a spirit is manifest in the laws of the Universe-a spirit vastly superior to that of man, and one in the face of which we with our modest powers must feel humble. Albert Einstein


+ 221 A human being is a part of the whole, called by us Universe, a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest-a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole nature in its beauty. Albert Einstein


+ 203 The human mind is not capable of grasping the Universe. We are like a little child entering a huge library. The walls are covered to the ceilings with books in many different tongues. The child knows that someone must have written these books. It does not know who or how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. But the child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books—a mysterious order which it does not comprehend, but only dimly suspects. Albert Einstein


+ 235 What I see in Nature is a magnificent structure that we can comprehend only very imperfectly, and that must fill a thinking person with a feeling of humility. This is a genuinely religious feeling that has nothing to do with mysticism. Albert Einstein


+ 189 God said, Man has now become like one of us in knowing good and evil. Now he must be prevented from putting forth his hand and also taking from the Tree of Life. He can eat it and live forever! Bereshit 3:22


+ 151 Instead, you must go to my father's house and to my family, and take a wife for my son. Bereshit 24:38


+ 138 And now, go and work, but you will not be given stubble. Nevertheless, the same number of bricks you must give. Shemot 5:18


+ 120 It must be eaten in one house; you shall not take any of the meat out of the house to the outside, neither shall you break any of its bones. Shemot 12:46


+ 105 And the person with tzara'ath, in whom there is the lesion, his garments shall be torn, his head shall be unshorn, he shall cover himself down to his mustache and call out, Unclean! Unclean! Vayikra 13:45


+ 108 The nakedness of your sister, whether your father's daughter or your mother's daughter, whether born to one who may remain in the home or born to one who must be sent outside you shall not uncover their nakedness. Vayikra 18:9


+ 83 However, a firstborn animal that must be sacrificed as a firstborn to the Lord no man may consecrate it; whether it be an ox or sheep, it belongs to the Lord. Vayikra 27:26


+ 79 He answered, saying, What the Lord puts into my mouth that I must take care to say. Bamidbar 23:12


+ 61 Whatever is used in fire you shall pass through fire and then it will be clean; it must, however, also be cleansed with sprinkling water, and whatever is not used in fire you shall pass through water. Bamidbar 31:23


+ 79 But you must remember the Lord your God, for it is He that gives you strength to make wealth, in order to establish His covenant which He swore to your forefathers, as it is this day. Devarim 8:18


+ 78 And he shall not take many wives for himself, and his heart must not turn away, and he shall not acquire much silver and gold for himself. Devarim 17:17


+ 85 Rather, he must acknowledge the firstborn, the son of the despised [wife] and give him a double share in all that he possesses, because he [this firstborn son] is the first of his strength, then he has the birthright entitlement. Devarim 21:17


+ 88 The hidden things belong to the Lord, our God, but the revealed things apply to us and to our children forever: that we must fulfill all the words of this Torah. Devarim 29:28


+ 83 A Miami must-have is the trendy Panther Coffee in Wynwood. I like Alma Mexicana for the ever-popular breakfast burrito. For out-of-this-world Cuban food, the Cubano at Little Bread Cuban Sandwich Co. will satisfy your craving. My friends all love Shorty's Bar-B-Q for the mouth-watering corn on the cob and BBQ, of course. Ivanka Trump


+ 85 That's one of the nice things. I mean, part of the beauty of me is that I'm very rich. So if I need $600 million, I can put $600 million myself. That's a huge advantage. I must tell you, that's a huge advantage over the other candidates. Donald Trump


+ 92 We must speak our minds openly, debate our disagreements honestly, but always pursue solidarity. Donald Trump


+ 87 Every decision on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs, will be made to benefit American workers and American families. We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our products, stealing our companies, and destroying our jobs. Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength. Donald Trump


+ 46 You must be the change you wish to see in the world. Mahatma Ghandi


+ 71 A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. Jesus Christ


+ 62 Picture Quote - As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy


+ 86 It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light. Aristotle


+ 73 The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched - they must be felt with the heart. Helen Keller


+ 74 To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one's family, to bring peace to all, one must first discipline and control one's own mind. If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him. Buddha


+ 65 He who learns must suffer. And even in our sleep pain that cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart, and in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom to us by the awful grace of God. Aeschylus


+ 72 We live in a society bloated with data yet starved for wisdom. We're connected 24/7, yet anxiety, fear, depression and loneliness is at an all-time high. We must course-correct. Elizabeth Kapu'uwailani Lindsey


+ 63 The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends. Friedrich Nietzsche


+ 65 In order to live in realization of the soul, we must let our false ego and all of its designations and attachments die


+ 76 Every decision must be made in harmony with what is actually the purpose of life


+ 77 If you are not being attacked by materialist, you must be doing something wrong


+ 55 You must be the change you wish to see in the world. Gandhi


+ 79 We think sometimes that poverty is only being hungry, naked and homeless. The poverty of being unwanted, unloved and uncared for is the greatest poverty. We must start in our own homes to remedy this kind of poverty. Mother Theresa


+ 71 I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do. Leonardo da Vinci


+ 104 The mind of the painter must resemble a mirror, which always takes the colour of the object it reflects and is completely occupied by the images of as many objects as are in front of it. Leonardo da Vinci


+ 71 What you must understand about me is that I’m a deeply unhappy person. John Green, Looking for Alaska


+ 78 No one should ever ask themselves that: why am I unhappy? The question carries within it the virus that will destroy everything. If we ask that question, it means we want to find out what makes us happy. If what makes us happy is different from what we have now, then we must either change once and for all or stay as we are, feeling even more unhappy. Paulo Coelho, The Zahir


+ 85 “But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness, I want sin.' 'In fact,' said Mustapha Mond, 'you're claiming the right to be unhappy.' 'All right then,' said the Savage defiantly, 'I'm claiming the right to be unhappy.' 'Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent; the right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat; the right to be lousy; the right to live in constant apprehension of what may happen tomorrow; the right to catch typhoid; the right to be tortured by unspeakable pains of every kind.' There was a long silence. 'I claim them all,' said the Savage at last. Mustapha Mond shrugged his shoulders. 'You're welcome," he said.” Aldous Huxley, Brave New World


+ 77 It almost seemed as if there must be some random and of course unfair thrift in the emotional housekeeping of the world, if the great happiness - however temporary, however flimsy - of one person could come out of the great unhappiness of another. Alice Munro, Too Much Happiness


+ 88 But Philip was impatient with himself; he called to mind his idea of the pattern of life: the unhappiness he had suffered was no more than part of a decoration which was elaborate and beautiful; he told himself strenuously that he must accept with gaiety everything, dreariness and excitement, pleasure and pain, because it added to the richness of the design. W. Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage


+ 87 A person whom is unhappy with life realizes that their construction of a self-image is incompatible with their earthly reality. An unhappy person must alter their internal or external world; otherwise, their sadness, sorrow, grief, and misery will remain unabated. Misery and desperation can lead to change, but only if a person is willing to learn, explore, and try. Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls


+ 86 After or before any happiness, someone must cry. Michael Bassey Johnson, Master of Maxims


+ 130 I must have had some high object in life, for I feel unbounded strength within me. But I never discovered it and was carried away by the allurements of empty, un-rewarding passions. I was tempered in their flames and came out cold and hard as steel, but I'd lost forever that fire of noble endeavour, that finest flower of life. How many time since then have I been an axe in the hands of fate? Like an engine of execution, I've descended on the heads of the condemned, often without malice, but always without pity. My love has brought no one happiness, for I've never sacrificed a thing for those I've loved. I've loved for myself, for my own pleasure, I've only tried to satisfy a strange inner need. I've fed on their feelings, love, joys and sufferings, and always wanted more. I'm like a starving man who falls asleep exhausted and sees rich food and sparkling wines before him. He rapturously falls on these phantom gifts of the imagination and feels better, but the moment he wakes up his dream disappears and he's left more hungry and desperate than before. Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time


+ 144 In my own shire, if I was sad
Homely comforters I had:
The earth, because my heart was sore,
Sorrowed for the son she bore;
And standing hills, long to remain,
Shared their short-lived comrade's pain.
And bound for the same bourn as I,
On every road I wandered by,
Trod beside me, close and dear,
The beautiful and death-struck year:
Whether in the woodland brown
I heard the beechnut rustle down,
And saw the purple crocus pale
Flower about the autumn dale;
Or littering far the fields of May
Lady-smocks a-bleaching lay,
And like a skylit water stood
The bluebells in the azured wood.

Yonder, lightening other loads,
The season range the country roads,
But here in London streets I ken
No such helpmates, only men;
And these are not in plight to bear,
If they would, another's care.
They have enough as 'tis: I see
In many an eye that measures me
The mortal sickness of a mind
Too unhappy to be kind.
Undone with misery, all they can
Is to hate their fellow man;
And till they drop they needs must still
Look at you and wish you ill.

A.E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad


+ 138 How do you get rid of unhappiness? You must release yourself from the prison you have unknowingly placed yourself in. Come to terms with the fact that there are things that you cannot control. But, just because you don’t ‘control’ something, doesn’t mean it’s going to fall to pieces. That may be the hardest part. We get bent out of shape when something happens that is out of our control, because we don’t understand why it’s happening or where it’s coming from. It’s unsettling. You put your fighting arms up and prepare to battle the world. But, stop for a moment. Think. Where are all of these things coming from? The world is not a wild, untamed place, where things are a free for all. Understand that there is a higher power running the world. Leigh Hershkovich


+ 135 She searched her mind for a single day when it had felt good to be alive. There must have been one, surely? Rachel Abbott, Only the Innocent


+ 134 You judge a society by how it treats its citizens. We must do our best to ensure that every child can live in comfort and security, with the best possible education. Melania Trump


+ 133 At times we may grow distressed, hearing of some great quality that we ourselves do not possess. We may become as nothing in our eyes. Then depression starts to tarnish the luster of our soul. In the presence of that quality of greatness that we cannot attain, our spirituality grows dull. At such times, we must fortify ourselves not to envy another’s fortune. We must use our feeling of insignificance only to an appropriate degree: to overcome ego, so as not to grow proud. But we should be satisfied and joyful with our lot. We should cling ever more forcefully to our strong points. Then our light will break forth like the dawn, and our healed spirit will swiftly blossom. Rav Avraham Yitzchak Kook


+ 144 Who Is a Kabbalist? The Kabbalist is a researcher who studies his nature using a proven, time-tested and accurate method. He studies the essence of his existence using tools we can all utilize feelings, intellect and heart. A Kabbalist looks like an ordinary person. He need not have any special skills, talents, or occupation. He need not be a wise man or wear a holy expression. At some point in his life, this ordinary person decided to look for a way in which he would find credible answers to the questions that were troubling him. By utilizing a distinct method of learning, he was successful in acquiring an extra sense a sixth sense which is the spiritual sense. Through this sense, the Kabbalist feels the spiritual spheres as a clear reality, just as we feel our reality here; he receives knowledge about the spiritual spheres, the upper worlds, and the revelation of higher forces. These worlds are called upper worlds, since they are higher than and beyond our world. The Kabbalist ascends from his current spiritual level to the next one. This movement brings him from one upper world to the next. He sees the roots from which everything that exists here has developed, everything that fills our world, including ourselves. The Kabbalist is simultaneously in our world, and in the upper worlds. This quality is shared by all Kabbalists. Kabbalists receive the real information that surrounds us, and feel this reality. Therefore, they can study it, be familiar with it, and teach us about it. They provide a new method through which we can meet the source of our lives, leading us to spirituality. They use books that are written in a special language. We must read these books in a special way, so they become a Vessel for discovering the truth for us as well. In the books they have written, the Kabbalists inform us about the techniques based on mans personal experiences. From their all-encompassing point of view, they have found the way to help those who would follow, and then climb the same ladder as they did. Their method is called the wisdom of Kabbalah. Rav Michael Laitman


+ 123 Fighting evil is a very noble activity when it must be done. But it is not our mission in life. Our job is to bring in more light. Rabbi Tzvi Freeman


+ 114 If we understand deeply that what we see is a reflection of who we are and how we are choosing to perceive, we can then choose to perceive in a positive and uplifting manner. Thus, we must be careful how we view things, or interpret them, as our very ‘seeing’ affects the quality of that thing. Also, we should always be conscious that when a person sees something deeply, it becomes a part of him, and thereby choose to create a better reality for ourselves with positive vision. When we immediately see something as negative, we need to go back into ourselves, where the light is being absorbed, and change the refraction. If we can imagine something as being wonderful and positive, we can see it that way, and when we see it that way - it becomes that way. When we view an event or a person in a positive light, we actually create positive energy which changes the very nature of that event or person. Rav DovBer Pinson


+ 302 Just for fun I recently asked Erin, “Now that the kids are in summer school, don’t you think it’s about time you went out and got yourself a job?  I hate seeing you wallow in unemployment for so long.” She smiled and said, “Wow.  I have been unemployed a really long time.  That’s weird…  I like it!”

Neither of us have had jobs since the ’90s (my only job was in 1992), so we’ve been self-employed for quite a while.  In our household it’s a running joke for one of us to say to the other, “Maybe you should get a job, derelict!” It’s like the scene in The Three Stooges where Moe tells Curly to get a job, and Curly backs away, saying, “No, please… not that!  Anything but that!” It’s funny that when people reach a certain age, such as after graduating college, they assume it’s time to go out and get a job.  But like many things the masses do, just because everyone does it doesn’t mean it’s a good idea.  In fact, if you’re reasonably intelligent, getting a job is one of the worst things you can do to support yourself.  There are far better ways to make a living than selling yourself into indentured servitude.

Here are some reasons you should do everything in your power to avoid getting a job:

1. Income for dummies.

Getting a job and trading your time for money may seem like a good idea.  There’s only one problem with it.  It’s stupid!  It’s the stupidest way you can possibly generate income!  This is truly income for dummies.

Why is getting a job so dumb?  Because you only get paid when you’re working.  Don’t you see a problem with that, or have you been so thoroughly brainwashed into thinking it’s reasonable and intelligent to only earn income when you’re working?  Have you never considered that it might be better to be paid even when you’re not working?  Who taught you that you could only earn income while working?  Some other brainwashed employee perhaps?

Don’t you think your life would be much easier if you got paid while you were eating, sleeping, and playing with the kids too?  Why not get paid 24/7?  Get paid whether you work or not.  Don’t your plants grow even when you aren’t tending to them?  Why not your bank account? Who cares how many hours you work?  Only a handful of people on this entire planet care how much time you spend at the office.  Most of us won’t even notice whether you work 6 hours a week or 60.  But if you have something of value to provide that matters to us, a number of us will be happy to pull out our wallets and pay you for it.  We don’t care about your time — we only care enough to pay for the value we receive.  Do you really care how long it took me to write this article?  Would you pay me twice as much if it took me 6 hours vs. only 3?

Non-dummies often start out on the traditional income for dummies path.  So don’t feel bad if you’re just now realizing you’ve been suckered.  Non-dummies eventually realize that trading time for money is indeed extremely dumb and that there must be a better way.  And of course there is a better way.  The key is to de-couple your value from your time. Smart people build systems that generate income 24/7, especially passive income.  This can include starting a business, building a web site, becoming an investor, or generating royalty income from creative work.  The system delivers the ongoing value to people and generates income from it, and once it’s in motion, it runs continuously whether you tend to it or not.  From that moment on, the bulk of your time can be invested in increasing your income (by refining your system or spawning new ones) instead of merely maintaining your income.

This web site is an example of such a system.  At the time of this writing, it generates about $9000 a month in income for me (update: $40,000 a month as of 10/31/06), and it isn’t my only income stream either.  I write each article just once (fixed time investment), and people can extract value from them year after year.  The web server delivers the value, and other systems (most of which I didn’t even build and don’t even understand) collect income and deposit it automatically into my bank account.  It’s not perfectly passive, but I love writing and would do it for free anyway.  But of course it cost me a lot of money to launch this business, right?  Um, yeah, $9 is an awful lot these days (to register the domain name).  Everything after that was profit. Sure it takes some upfront time and effort to design and implement your own income-generating systems.  But you don’t have to reinvent the wheel — feel free to use existing systems like ad networks and affiliate programs.  Once you get going, you won’t have to work so many hours to support yourself.  Wouldn’t it be nice to be out having dinner with your spouse, knowing that while you’re eating, you’re earning money?  If you want to keep working long hours because you enjoy it, go right ahead.  If you want to sit around doing nothing, feel free.  As long as your system continues delivering value to others, you’ll keep getting paid whether you’re working or not.

Your local bookstore is filled with books containing workable systems others have already designed, tested, and debugged.  Nobody is born knowing how to start a business or generate investment income, but you can easily learn it.  How long it takes you to figure it out is irrelevant because the time is going to pass anyway.  You might as well emerge at some future point as the owner of income-generating systems as opposed to a lifelong wage slave.  This isn’t all or nothing.  If your system only generates a few hundred dollars a month, that’s a significant step in the right direction.

2. Limited experience.

You might think it’s important to get a job to gain experience.  But that’s like saying you should play golf to get experience playing golf.  You gain experience from living, regardless of whether you have a job or not.  A job only gives you experience at that job, but you gain “experience” doing just about anything, so that’s no real benefit at all.  Sit around doing nothing for a couple years, and you can call yourself an experienced meditator, philosopher, or politician.

The problem with getting experience from a job is that you usually just repeat the same limited experience over and over.  You learn a lot in the beginning and then stagnate.  This forces you to miss other experiences that would be much more valuable.  And if your limited skill set ever becomes obsolete, then your experience won’t be worth squat.  In fact, ask yourself what the experience you’re gaining right now will be worth in 20-30 years.  Will your job even exist then?

Consider this.  Which experience would you rather gain?  The knowledge of how to do a specific job really well — one that you can only monetize by trading your time for money — or the knowledge of how to enjoy financial abundance for the rest of your life without ever needing a job again?  Now I don’t know about you, but I’d rather have the latter experience.  That seems a lot more useful in the real world, wouldn’t you say?

3. Lifelong domestication.

Getting a job is like enrolling in a human domestication program.  You learn how to be a good pet.

Look around you.  Really look.  What do you see?  Are these the surroundings of a free human being?  Or are you living in a cage for unconscious animals?  Have you fallen in love with the color beige? How’s your obedience training coming along?  Does your master reward your good behavior?  Do you get disciplined if you fail to obey your master’s commands?

Is there any spark of free will left inside you?  Or has your conditioning made you a pet for life? Humans are not meant to be raised in cages.  You poor thing…

4. Too many mouths to feed.

Employee income is the most heavily taxed there is.  In the USA you can expect that about half your salary will go to taxes.  The tax system is designed to disguise how much you’re really giving up because some of those taxes are paid by your employer, and some are deducted from your paycheck.  But you can bet that from your employer’s perspective, all of those taxes are considered part of your pay, as well as any other compensation you receive such as benefits.  Even the rent for the office space you consume is considered, so you must generate that much more value to cover it.  You might feel supported by your corporate environment, but keep in mind that you’re the one paying for it. Another chunk of your income goes to owners and investors.  That’s a lot of mouths to feed. It isn’t hard to understand why employees pay the most in taxes relative to their income.  After all, who has more control over the tax system?  Business owners and investors or employees? You only get paid a fraction of the real value you generate.  Your real salary may be more than triple what you’re paid, but most of that money you’ll never see.  It goes straight into other people’s pockets. What a generous person you are!

5. Way too risky.

Many employees believe getting a job is the safest and most secure way to support themselves. Morons.

Social conditioning is amazing.  It’s so good it can even make people believe the exact opposite of the truth. Does putting yourself in a position where someone else can turn off all your income just by saying two words (“You’re fired”) sound like a safe and secure situation to you?  Does having only one income stream honestly sound more secure than having 10?

The idea that a job is the most secure way to generate income is just silly.  You can’t have security if you don’t have control, and employees have the least control of anyone.  If you’re an employee, then your real job title should be professional gambler.

6. Having an evil bovine master.

When you run into an idiot in the entrepreneurial world, you can turn around and head the other way.  When you run into an idiot in the corporate world, you have to turn around and say, “Sorry, boss.”

Did you know that the word boss comes from the Dutch word baas, which historically means master?  Another meaning of the word boss is “a cow or bovine.”  And in many video games, the boss is the evil dude that you have to kill at the end of a level.

So if your boss is really your evil bovine master, then what does that make you?  Nothing but a turd in the herd. Who’s your daddy?

7. Begging for money.

When you want to increase your income, do you have to sit up and beg your master for more money?  Does it feel good to be thrown some extra Scooby Snacks now and then?

Or are you free to decide how much you get paid without needing anyone’s permission but your own?

If you have a business and one customer says “no” to you, you simply say “next.”

8. An inbred social life.

Many people treat their jobs as their primary social outlet.  They hang out with the same people working in the same field.  Such incestuous relations are social dead ends.  An exciting day includes deep conversations about the company’s switch from Sparkletts to Arrowhead, the delay of Microsoft’s latest operating system, and the unexpected delivery of more Bic pens.  Consider what it would be like to go outside and talk to strangers.  Ooooh… scary!  Better stay inside where it’s safe.

If one of your co-slaves gets sold to another master, do you lose a friend?  If you work in a male-dominated field, does that mean you never get to talk to women above the rank of receptionist?  Why not decide for yourself whom to socialize with instead of letting your master decide for you?  Believe it or not, there are locations on this planet where free people congregate.  Just be wary of those jobless folk — they’re a crazy bunch!

9. Loss of freedom.

It takes a lot of effort to tame a human being into an employee.  The first thing you have to do is break the human’s independent will.  A good way to do this is to give them a weighty policy manual filled with nonsensical rules and regulations.  This leads the new employee to become more obedient, fearing that s/he could be disciplined at any minute for something incomprehensible.  Thus, the employee will likely conclude it’s safest to simply obey the master’s commands without question.  Stir in some office politics for good measure, and we’ve got a freshly minted mind slave. As part of their obedience training, employees must be taught how to dress, talk, move, and so on.  We can’t very well have employees thinking for themselves, now can we?  That would ruin everything. God forbid you should put a plant on your desk when it’s against the company policy.  Oh no, it’s the end of the world!  Cindy has a plant on her desk!  Summon the enforcers!  Send Cindy back for another round of sterility training!

Free human beings think such rules and regulations are silly of course.  The only policy they need is:  “Be smart.  Be nice.  Do what you love.  Have fun.”

10. Becoming a coward.

Have you noticed that employed people have an almost endless capacity to whine about problems at their companies?  But they don’t really want solutions — they just want to vent and make excuses why it’s all someone else’s fault.  It’s as if getting a job somehow drains all the free will out of people and turns them into spineless cowards.  If you can’t call your boss a jerk now and then without fear of getting fired, you’re no longer free.  You’ve become your master’s property.

When you work around cowards all day long, don’t you think it’s going to rub off on you?  Of course it will.  It’s only a matter of time before you sacrifice the noblest parts of your humanity on the altar of fear:  first courage… then honesty… then honor and integrity… and finally your independent will.  You sold your humanity for nothing but an illusion.  And now your greatest fear is discovering the truth of what you’ve become.

I don’t care how badly you’ve been beaten down.  It is never too late to regain your courage.  Never!

Still want a job?

If you’re currently a well-conditioned, well-behaved employee, your most likely reaction to the above will be defensiveness.  It’s all part of the conditioning.  But consider that if the above didn’t have a grain of truth to it, you wouldn’t have an emotional reaction at all.  This is only a reminder of what you already know.  You can deny your cage all you want, but the cage is still there.  Perhaps this all happened so gradually that you never noticed it until now… like a lobster enjoying a nice warm bath. If any of this makes you mad, that’s a step in the right direction.  Anger is a higher level of consciousness than apathy, so it’s a lot better than being numb all the time.  Any emotion — even confusion — is better than apathy.  If you work through your feelings instead of repressing them, you’ll soon emerge on the doorstep of courage.  And when that happens, you’ll have the will to actually do something about your situation and start living like the powerful human being you were meant to be instead of the domesticated pet you’ve been trained to be.

Happily jobless

What’s the alternative to getting a job?  The alternative is to remain happily jobless for life and to generate income through other means.  Realize that you earn income by providing value — not time — so find a way to provide your best value to others, and charge a fair price for it.  One of the simplest and most accessible ways is to start your own business.  Whatever work you’d otherwise do via employment, find a way to provide that same value directly to those who will benefit most from it.  It takes a bit more time to get going, but your freedom is easily worth the initial investment of time and energy.  Then you can buy your own Scooby Snacks for a change. And of course everything you learn along the way, you can share with others to generate even more value.  So even your mistakes can be monetized.

One of the greatest fears you’ll confront is that you may not have any real value to offer others.  Maybe being an employee and getting paid by the hour is the best you can do.  Maybe you just aren’t worth that much.  That line of thinking is all just part of your conditioning.  It’s absolute nonsense.  As you begin to dump such brainwashing, you’ll soon recognize that you have the ability to provide enormous value to others and that people will gladly pay you for it.  There’s only one thing that prevents you from seeing this truth — fear.

All you really need is the courage to be yourself.  Your real value is rooted in who you are, not what you do.  The only thing you need actually do is express your real self to the world.  You’ve been told all sort of lies as to why you can’t do that.  But you’ll never know true happiness and fulfillment until you summon the courage to do it anyway.

The next time someone says to you, “Get a job,” I suggest you reply as Curly did:  “No, please… not that!  Anything but that!”  Then poke him right in the eyes.

You already know deep down that getting a job isn’t what you want.  So don’t let anyone try to tell you otherwise.  Learn to trust your inner wisdom, even if the whole world says you’re wrong and foolish for doing so.  Years from now you’ll look back and realize it was one of the best decisions you ever made.

Final thoughts

While I wouldn’t recommend starting an online business for everyone, for many people it’s one of the best ways to generate income without a job. It has certainly worked disgustingly well for me. If you’re interested in learning more about this option, please check out Build Your Own Successful Online Business for details.

About the author:

Steve Pavlina calls himself “the most intensely growth-oriented individual you will ever meet.” While sitting in a jail cell at age 19, Steve decided to dedicate his life to the pursuit of personal growth. Passionate about sharing what he learned with anyone who desires self-improvement, he has written more than 700 articles and has been featured in The New York Times, USA Today, and Self Magazine. As a result of giving away all his best ideas for free, Steve’s Website quickly became the most popular personal development site in the world, receiving more than 2 million visitors per month.


+ 93 It delivers one level of horror, and then the trapdoor opens and there are several additional levels of horror. In some way that must confirm to you that the world is a horrible place because it presents a society in which the world is a horrible place. If you're neurotic and fearful, then maybe "White Bear" tickles that synapse. But it's reassuring, in some way, to watch films that reveal society to be insane and heartless. It's like the filmmakers are saying, 'We're not saying that this is a realistic portrayal. It's a chilling nightmare'. Charlie Brooker


+ 63 Jerusalem must remain the world's Jewish spiritual capital, not a symbol of anguish and bitterness, but a symbol of trust and hope.


+ 75 What is the solution? Pressure will not produce a solution. Is there a solution? There must be, there will be. Why tackle the most complex and sensitive problem prematurely? Why not first take steps which will allow the Israeli and Palestinian communities to find ways to live together in an atmosphere of security. Why not leave the most difficult, the most sensitive issue, for such a time? Elie Wiesel


+ 69 Jerusalem must remain the world's Jewish spiritual capital, not a symbol of anguish and bitterness, but a symbol of trust and hope. As the Hasidic master Rebbe Nahman of Bratslav said, "Everything in this world has a heart; the heart itself has its own heart." Elie Wiesel


+ 80 Remember, you must not sleep at the Seder. If you do, Elijah the Prophet will come with a bag on his shoulders. On the two first nights of Passover, Elijah the Prophet goes about looking for those who have fallen asleep at the Seder, and takes them away in his bag. Sholom Aleichem


+ 82 Torah Learning for the Creative Individual

Outstanding people who are involved in Torah and who have a talent and inner predilection for ethical and poetic studies, for high thoughts and exalted wisdom, may not suppress or nullify that great desire.

They must broaden it and make it great. They must every day engage in Torah learning that is broad and that transmits knowledge, wisdom and ability.

Such people must dedicate most of their talent to such learning. They should not worry that this dedication may force them to curtail their practical Torah learning, leading them to satisfy themselves with learning that is easy, short and straight, allowing them to simply know the halachah and its reasoning clearly, and allowing them to simply clarify everything in its time with the calm learning of breadth of knowledge in (a) halachah, (b) the basic Talmud discussions and (c) the various approaches of the sages.

This will not keep them from being sharp. True Torah sharpness is naturally born of this learning [mentioned above] of itself, and appears when it is needed.

One does not need to work hard and spend a great deal of time on pilpul. As it is, most pilpul is intended for those [who, not being poetic,] turn to it to fulfill the thirst of their soul for the breadth of Torah and powerful intellectual freedom.

A little pilpul is always good, even for those who are mostly involved in very spiritual matters; but the basic concern of these sensitive souls must be “to open the eyes of the blind; to bring the prisoner out of the jail; to take the man sitting in darkness out of his cell” (Is. 42:7).

Eder Hay’kar, p. 140


+ 89 Torah for its Own Sake

What is the essence of learning Torah for its own sake?

In spiritual teachings, this is self-understood. Such teachings are openly concerned with coming close to God and elevation in sanctity. We are uplifted by these teachings.

But what about Torah texts on practical matters?

We must understand that these are all branches and garments of the light of divine honesty and justice. Within their details, we may find the divine soul of the perfection of the world: in life, in physicality and in spirit, in community and in the individual. Once we realize this, light gleams and descends into every detail. Once the feeling of our inner heart and mind is dedicated to the divine and inclusive illumination hidden in the multitude of these practical teachings, we come to an inner revelation within every detail, which shines in accordance with the capability of our individual spirit.

At times, our thought broadens and takes such clear form that we may even express and explicate the spark of divine light that we have understood in some of those details. And in this elevated state, we uplift all the details.

At other times, the matter is revealed only as a subtle glimmer in the chambers of our heart. Even then, however, this lifts our soul to an elevated state, through which all of life is rarified.

In regard to this latter manifestation, our sages stated: “Whoever learns Torah for its own sake merits many things.” And regarding the former inclusive illumination, they added: “And not only that, but the whole world is considered worthwhile for his sake.”

Orot Hatorah 2:2


+ 83 One Command

The essence of knowledge is that the totality of the Torah should cleave to our hearts so strongly and with such clear understanding that this totality will powerfully pour forth, resulting in a powerful, individual concern for every mitzvah and detail of the Torah. This will be like the powerful life-force that pours forth from the heart, spreading to every limb.

This is not the case when there is no true, all-encompassing knowledge. Then everything in the Torah is separate. This creates confusion in our basic understanding of the Torah. It prevents our service of love and generosity. Then “the word of Hashem shall be for you a command and a command, a line and a line.”

We must recognize the words of the Torah as one law and one command.

Orot Hatorah 3:3


+ 90 A Love of the Entirety

Every individual matter in the Torah flows from the entire Torah: from the written Torah, the oral Torah, any good learning, any mitzvah, and any good trait.

There are differences between these levels. But the love and joy in performing the mitzvos and in learning Torah for its own sake must be a love of the entirety: a love of all the light, life, holiness and supernal spirituality—literally, of all of it. It is stored and hidden within whatever detail we are involved with. And it grows prominent due to the content of that detail, in all the manifestations of its light, glory and holy radiance.

Orot Hatorah 4:3


+ 99 Far from Words of Torah

There are a number of causes that can keep us far from words of Torah and prevent them from entering our hearts. We must always know the cause of such an obstacle when we feel it, so that we may know how to remove it and allow our heart to be open to a clear connection with the Torah’s words.

If we do not know the correct cause, we might busy ourselves in extensive work to remove some other cause, which is not presently impeding us. Then the real cause that keeps us from clinging to Torah will remain in place, and we will stay confused.

Some of these causes are spiritual; others physical. Some stem from inadequate preparation of the holy; others from inadequate preparation of the this-worldly.

Orot Hatorah 7:1


+ 94 The Plain of Halachah and Aggadah

When we begin to take steps upon the plain of halachah and aggadah, a multitude beyond number of unions and harmonies beyond number is drawn out. The universes of heaven and earth, humanity of the flesh and humanity of ideas, with all the wealth hidden in each of them, are then unified. They bring each other to the wished?for action that leads toward complete growth and perfection.

This connection is nothing less than the revelation of the unity that had been hidden within them from the very beginning.

Whoever has not tasted the flavor of halachah has not tasted the flavor of Torah. And whoever has not tasted the flavor of aggadah has not tasted the flavor of­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ fear of sin.

Torah and fear of sin must always accompany one another. The service of Torah learning must be methodically revealed, in an active form, upon this unifying basis—one whose results are very great.

In truth, aggadah always contains a halachic essence. Similarly, halachah contains an inner agaddic content. In the main, the content of aggadah is found in the qualitative form of halachah. And the content of halachah is found in the quantitative form of aggadah. Even without any particular search or awareness, when we learn halachah, we are touched by its hidden content of aggadah; and, when we learn aggadah, we are touched by the pulse of halachah that is folded into the content of the aggadah.

However, not everyone has a properly keen awareness of these two streams—each of which is constantly filled with the content of the other. An alienation between these worlds, which are in essence so joined and twinned together, leads to an unhealthy separation in the nature of deep study and its broadening. It constricts these two areas—halachic and the aggadic—to a narrow arena.

We must clearly bring forth the meeting of these two forces in a rectified form, when each will make the other_s content exceedingly fragrant. Each will profoundly aid the other to bring forth its details and to shine a more brilliant light upon its own general appearance and upon the depth of its own internal logic and what that embraces. The scent of aggadah must make halachah fragrant, in a measure that is well?reasoned and fitting. And aggadah must be given its worth within a framework, with set laws and a clear, defined logic—like the form of a strengthened halachah. With this, the power and freshness of both will be multiplied.

The need that brought the masters of pilpul in previous generations to at times attempt to integrate aggadah and halachah welled forth from this demand for a unification of these forces, which so much act in unison.

We are already called upon to gather together talents and knowledge in order to clarify our learning and all the paths of our lives. In particular, the essence of halachic learning must be broad, composed of the various approaches of the early and later authorities who have grown to be so many over the generations—we very much need that depth and breadth. And we must approach with complete breadth the unity of the contents of halachah and aggadah—which includes the categories of logic and history, ethics and faith, feeling and civility.

And resting upon all of them is a pure phenomenon, one soaked with the dew of the life of the totality of the light of Torah, ready to rest like a beautiful ornament upon all those who learn Torah for its own sake, giving them a special sensitivity and satisfaction of the heart?inspiring joy of Torah.

Orot Hakodesh I, pp. 26?27


+ 76 The Two Companions

The oral Torah draws sustenance in a hidden manner from the heavenly, and in a revealed manner from the earthly.

The land of Israel must be built up, with all the people of Israel dwelling upon it in a well-ordered manner: with the Temple and a kingdom, with cohanim and prophecy, with judges and officers and all their accouterments. Then the oral Torah will live in all the glow of its beauty. It will flower and bloom. With its entire measure, it will connect to the written Torah.

In exile, these twins were separated. The written Torah rose to the heights of holiness, and the oral Torah descended to the very depths. Nevertheless, [the oral Torah] receives a silent sustenance from the light of the written Torah, from its past uncultivated growth, which suffices to allow it to exist, [although] with a constrained life.

Every day, [the oral Torah] descends and falls. But one day the breeze will blow and the light of life will arrive from the treasury of eternal redemption. Then Israel will grow strong. We will be planted upon our land and improve in all the magnificence of our structure. Then the oral Torah will begin to blossom, from the depth of its root. It will rise higher and higher. The light of the written Torah will shine the rays of its light upon it anew: “new for the morning.” Then these companions will unite in the realm of their bridal chamber.

And the light of the soul of God, the Life of worlds, which is revealed in the revival of Israel (when our horn is lifted), will shine with the light of the seven days of the light of the sun and the light of the moon combined.

Then their light will be straight and penetrating, connecting one extremity to the other. It will respond to the land and the nation in every manifestation of life. The light of the moon will be like the light of the sun. And the light of the sun will shine sevenfold, like the light of the seven days, on the day that God binds the fracture of His nation and heals the illness of its wound.

Orot Hatorah 1:3


+ 79 The Business for Which We Are Suited

Every one of us must engage in the business for which we are suited.

This is particularly true regarding Torah learning. At times, circumstances may make it difficult for you to stand firm in what your heart desires. But nevertheless, you must stay strong and not relinquish that which is suited for your particular spirit.

Orot Hatorah 9:1


+ 95 Torah Scholars Whose Learning Is Their Occupation

Torah scholars whose learning is their occupation must see to it that their path lies correctly before them and that their goal is clear, so that their spirit may be strong and their mind quiet, calm and settled.

How great is the exalted principle, “You are not required to finish, yet neither are you absolved of the work.” Therefore, there is not such a great need to visualize self-encouragement in your Torah-learning service that involves embracing the totality of its knowledge.

This can calm your heart, so that you may learn every topic with a confident and quiet spirit, undisturbed by other things or by worrying in general about attaining total knowledge, which is impossible. Instead, you find your own personal service acceptable.

Nevertheless, you must pave a path for yourself upon which you can still see the complete circumference of the Torah.

In ideology, you must gain clarity about your purpose and the purpose of your desire in your Torah-learning service of God. Also, in practical learning, you must yearn to encompass and incorporate the complete sum of the entire practical teachings that are in the Torah’s practical aspect—as far as you can.

People customarily say that the Torah has no end. In regard to its practical aspect, that is true only within certain parameters—for really, it is possible, when a person goes on a straight path, to attain a total and clear embrace of the entire practical aspect of the Torah.

Those who are great need no explanation for this. But those of middle rank need help, after they arrive at the measure of competent understanding of the depth of halachah, in knowing the form of halachah in a straight and proper way, [which they gain] by serving Torah scholars in correct measure, until they know how to study any Talmudic discussion properly, and how to question and answer in accordance with the path of Torah in the give and take of halachah. Then their main effort must be, first and foremost, to encompass all the halachos of the Rif in their simple meaning, with competent breadth of knowledge. The attainment of this is made much easier by a calm steadfastness.

This service is very sweet in itself, as well as a pleasurable vision that is close to the goal of total encompassing , knowing the complete sum of all the halachos—according to how very close [their study is] to their source in the Talmud in general. Only through the gathering of all the details will the great beauty of the glorious building of the entire practical Torah stand before your eyes.

When you proceed in this fashion every day, continuously, you will add study-times dedicated to an overall mastery of the written Torah, and you will spend set aside times every day for acquiring the wisdom of the aggadah, midrash, ethical works, philosophy and Kabbalah, in proper proportion, and a breadth of time for independent thought, in order to broaden good sensibilities, as well as your set time for learning Talmud quickly every day, and as well as occasional times for clarifying the depth of halachah broadly and engaging in sharp analysis of various topics, in order to broaden your mind and study in-depth, which is crucial for all those who seek the Torah.

When you acquire an encompassing expertise in the halachos of the Rif, there will be born within you the desire to know the halachos clearly. You will learn a great deal of Talmud (Babylonian and Jerusalem), Toseftas and all the words of the Sages, out of an inner recognition of the need for breadth and clarity. The essence of your service must always be in broad learning of the foundations of the halachos and the essentials of the words of Torah, until the perfection of knowledge in all the areas and details will make your awareness whole in all other matters that a person needs. And at that point, people will be inspired by your advice and counsel.

When you proceed in this way, you will also be able to set fixed times for acquiring the wisdom and knowledge that are useful to a person in this world, which broaden the circumference of your knowledge and give you the courage to face the necessities of life. Then you will be pleasing to others and you will find grace in the eyes of God and man.

Orot Hatorah 9:3


+ 74 The Sweetness

A diminution of the sweetness of the pleasantness of Torah results from something lacking in the Jewish nature of the soul.

[The soul] must be rectified by means of self-growth directed toward this lack.

And when our mind is engaged in rectifying this lack, immediately the supernal light of the holy nature of our soul again shines, and the sweetness of the Torah again begins to be revealed.

Orot Hatorah 7:4


+ 84 I have seen it written that the prohibition from Above to refrain from open study in the wisdom of truth was only for a limited period, until the end of 1490, but from then on the prohibition has been lifted and permission was granted to study the Zohar. Since 1540 it has been a great Mitzva (commandment) for the masses to study in public, old and young... and that is because the Messiah will come because of that and not because of any other reason. Therefore, we must not be negligent. Rabbi Abraham Ben Mordechai Azulai, Introduction to the book, Ohr HaChama, Light of the Sun


+ 84 Israel must not only be an asset but a value. A moral, cultural and scientific call for the promotion of man, every man. It must be a good and warm home for Jews who are not Israelis, as well as for Israelis who are not Jews. And it must create equal opportunities for all, without discriminating between religion, nationality, community or sex... I have seen Israel in its most difficult hours and also in moments of achievement and spiritual uplifting. My years place me at an observation point from which can be viewed the scene of our reviving nation, spread out in all its glory... Permit me to remain an optimist. Permit me to be a dreamer of his people. If sometimes the atmosphere is autumnal, and also if today, the day seems suddenly grey, the president Israel has chosen will never tire of encouraging, awakening and reminding - because spring is waiting for us. The spring will definitely come. Shimon Peres, President's inaugural address, July 2007


+ 89 A man is out in the woods when he comes across a bear. Frightened for his life, he runs as fast as he can to escape the bear and hides in a cave. He is horrified to find that the bear has run after him into the cave, and now the man is trapped. He closes his eyes and begins to recite "Sh'ma Yisrael" in anticipation of his final moments. When he is finished, he opens his eyes and is surprised to see the bear in front of him with his eyes closed - also praying. The man thinks to himself "how lucky am I to be cornered by what must be the only Jewish bear! We're mishpocheh - I'm saved!" And then he listens more carefully to the bear's prayer "hamotzi lechem minhaaretz"


+ 90 Harry Goldberg has been elected the next president of the United States--the first Jewish boy to reach the Whitehouse. He is very proud and phones his mother in New York to invite her to the inauguration. Harry: Momma, guess what! I've just been elected president, won't you come to my inauguration?
Mother: Harry! You know I hate trains. I can't face the journey all the way to Washington.
Maybe next time.
Harry: Momma! You will take no train. Air Force One will collect you.
The journey will be over in 30 minutes. Come to my inauguration, please...
Mother: Harry, I hate hotels. The non-kosher food! Nahh, maybe next time.
Harry: Momma!! You will stay in the White House, a kosher chef to yourself. PLEASE come.
Mother: Harry! I have nothing to wear! Harry: I have someone on his way to take you to Macy's and Bloomingdale's to make you look perfect. You must come!!!
Mother: Okay, okay, I suppose I will come. Inaugaration day comes. Mother is on the front row, next to the Secretary of State. Harry is called up to become the next president. Mother digs the Secretary of State in the ribs and says, "Hey, you see that boy Harry? His brother is a very successful doctor!"


+ 86 An American Indian comes back to the Reservation to visit with his parents after spending some time in New York. He says to his father that he's fallen in love with a nice Jewish girl. His father is mortified and says " You're betraying your heritage and you'll break your mother's heart that you're not marrying a nice Indian girl. You know how Jews are, they'll feel the same way and you'll be ostracized in both camps." The son reassures his father, "Don't worry. They must have already accepted the situation because they have already given their daughter an Indian name." "Really?" says the father. "What name?" The son answers, "Sitting Shiva."


+ 31 The Torah that we which engage in is in order to subdue the evil inclination, to attain Dvekut [adhesion] with the Creator: that all one’s actions will be solely in order to bestow. Alone, it is impossible that one will able to go against nature, since the matter of mind and heart, in which one must be complemented, necessitates receiving assistance, and that assistance is through the Torah, as our sages said, “I have created the evil inclination, I have created the Torah as a spice.” This is so because while engaging in It, the Light in it reforms them. Rabash, The Rungs of the Ladder, “What Is Torah and Work on the Path of the Creator”


+ 31 Thus, we see that the main work we must do, to achieve the purpose for which the world was created—to do good to His creations—is to qualify ourselves to acquire vessels of bestowal. This is the correction for making the King’s gift complete, so they will feel no shame upon reception of the pleasures. And all the evil in us removes us from the good that we are destined to receive. We were given the remedy of Torah and Mitzvot so as to achieve those Kelim. This is the meaning of what our sages said (Kidushin, 30), “The Creator says, ‘I have created the evil inclination, I have created for it the spice of Torah,’ by which he will lose all the sparks of self-love within him and will be rewarded with his desire being only to bestow contentment upon his Maker.” Rabash, The Rungs of the Ladder, “What Is the Substance of Slander and Against Whom Is It?”


+ 45 God’s Law on mount Sinai. God's Law on mount Sinai Mankind on Earth is of the opinion that the word “impossible” applies to a lot of things. – We hold a different opinion, because the things we regard utopia to day, may be possible tomorrow. There are therefore practically no utopias. If one had told people 4,000 years ago about all the things you have today, one would have regarded all of this without exception as impossible. Utopias have become reality. Today’s generation’s fantasies are certainly realisable. This is why we absolutely cannot understand why one doubts our existence. Why can’t one comprehend that we travel beyond the speed of light? – Why does one doubt the possibility that dematerialisation exists? There is no utopia. Everything is possible, if one knows the way to realise it. It isn’t for instance utopia that we, respectively our forefathers, brought the LAW of HEAVEN down to Earth. The handing over of the LAW of HEAVEN took place on Mount Sinai. I have indicated details about this once before in the past. If the handing over of this important event didn’t take place conspicuously enough, then it is mainly due to the technological ignorance of the people at that time. What could they have known about spaceships travelling through space? – As far as Moses was concerned, the spaceship was “GOD’S ABODE” and the rest of the crew “HIS ANGELS”. The siren was the “divine trombone” and the ships antigravity was GOD’S promise to “put anyone to death” that crossed a certain line. All of this is so simple and so easy to understand if one is willing to use one’s mind. You have enough technical experience to correctly comprehend the LEGISLATION received on Mount Sinai. There is absolutely no room for doubt here, because any doubt would indicate mental derangement. He, who doesn’t comprehend this plausible LEGISLATION, also does not know how a car is steered and unaware of the energy that moves it. There is however also an evil will that prevents comprehension. Generally speaking, these people are not dumb; there are even some very famous authorities in politics and the sciences amongst them as well as people in the field of theology. This evil will is like a blinker for spiritual eyes. People do not want to know the TRUTH, because it perturbs them personally. Atheists doubt GOD’S COMMANDMENTS. They deem it impossible that GOD talked to a human being on Mount Sinai amidst thunder and lightning. God's Law on mount SinaiThe Israelites saw a fiery cloud moving in front of them. This pillar of fire hovered horizontally. This pillar of fire did not hover vertically as Jewish theology assumes. There is no mentioning of a vertical pillar anywhere. This pillar was one of our spaceships, that is to say, a mother-ship. Their aura of light can still be observed on all our flying objects by you. The material of the spaceships under our control consists of a glass-like mass that is harder than your normal glass. The colour is similar to a Nile-green. The bible describes its appearance as being similar to chrysolite. Antigravity is so powerful that the landing must take place on solid rock. Our spaceships of this size land on Mount Etna or similar mountain these days. So as not to suffer any injuries, the Israelites were advised to stay beyond a boundary, crossing this boundary could be life threatening. A siren of great sound intensity warned the people from crossing the indicated boundary. Moses could only cross this boundary after the gravitational force was switched off. He received an appropriate signal. There was neither thunder nor lightning, only the din of the spaceship and its alternating aura of light. When the antigravity field was switched on, the Israelites fled in all directions filled with fear and terror. Ashtar


+ 45 A religion that absolves a person from responsibility in front of a higher JUDGE after that person’s demise is a last straw that everybody is willing to grasp. But such a religion is only a piece of straw and not a life belt. What we offer mankind is a life belt it can depend upon. We know that our friends on this Earth work their fingers to the bone to disseminate the TRUTH. We cannot offer you any financial support. We can only offer you the TRUTH. Everything else is left up to progress. We presently still trust this progress. Communistic atheism will also have to abdicate, because the TRUTH will not allow itself to be held up. We are only surprised that the churches are so narrow minded that they do not recognise the TRUTH. It is their duty to primarily work on behalf of the TRUTH. This is their assignment, their sacred MISSION, the way it is also our MISSION. If the people on Earth would really believe in GOD, things on this Terra would be completely different. This planet is however enveloped by the darkness of ignorance. This is why there is murder and mayhem. Our problem consists in trying to demonstrate to you that this faithlessness is a mistake. This is not an easy assignment, because the most august TRUTH can be twisted and devitalised through malevolence. Religious communities are not exempt from this. The fanatic and dogmatic doggedly sticks to his points of view and woe to him that dares to question this. A lot will have been achieved once the LEGISLATION received on Mount Sinai has been verified; a lot of things will inevitably have to change. The people on Earth only obey orders when they fear something and this is why the divine LAW must be feared. The LAW of the LORD however doesn’t just apply during one’s terrestrial existence – on the contrary, is also has an effect after one’s life on Earth. The MESSENGER CHRIST solemnly indicated that this was so. GOD’S LAW does not only concern man’s behaviourism according to GOD’S wishes, HIS LAWS are more than terrestrial laws; they are a part of the laws of nature. He who acts against the laws of nature will face the potency of the consequences. As I am already talking about atheism, I might as well emphasise that theistic religion also contains a fair portion of atheism, because all the pious fuss within it is part of it. The leading stratums of society are of the opinion that death extinguishes man’s consciousness forever. These people hold onto this thesis with an iron grip. They indignantly, well actually arrogantly, reject any other explanation. It therefore comes as no surprise that this terrible aberration impacts on all their decisions. One leading politician made a name for himself by admitting openly that he regards GOD to be a superstitious fantasy. We place the greatest importance in the conclusion that a GOD exists. We also place importance in the fact that every human being throughout the universe possesses an imperishable existence, one that runs through many different phases. Amongst them is a conscious phases of a spiritual existence wherein one has to give account for all one’s thoughts and actions. The churches established a series of dogmas that do not help mankind; they rather lead towards an abyss. One of these dogmas refers to a “Day of Judgement” and “Resurrection”. One does not have to spend a lot of time discussing the “Resurrection” of the human soul with its consciousness at all; it is as certain as physical death. The “Day of Judgement” however plays an important part, because: The so-called Day of Judgement is the last day of one’s terrestrial, physical existence. Ashtar


+ 49 Ashtar Sheran, Eternal life, Heaven and HellThis is where the cause of atheism is to be found! I therefore assert that medical science bears the full blame for the rise of world atheism and political differences. Researchers verifying that the opposite is true, namely that man has an astral soul, are viciously attacked and dismissed in a most unfair way. I will select just one crass example of a medical contortion: Every amputee still feels the limb he physically lost. He feels the limb of his astral soul. Every nerve is present. Physicians explain this phenomenon by asserting that we are only dealing with memory here, an echo of one’s senses. Those aware of the TRUTH would have to laugh, – if the consequences weren’t so dire. The broader masses within nations assume that a scientist with a doctor’s degree is, based on his academic education, is able to think more logically and more reliably that your average citizen. This is another world wide mistake that has dire consequences. I have quite often pointed out the eternal existence of human life to you. I don’t mean the human flesh and blood existence, but the spiritual existence of man. Man is a part of the universe, a perpetual particle of GOD. We gave the fact that there is no peaceful coexistence on Terra a lot of thought. The reason for this can be found in the level of spiritual development on TERRA. One also thinks too superficially in high politics and in diplomacy. A large part of the brain lays completely neglected. It is very important to look far ahead. You are incapable of such projections. The moment your thoughts reach a certain point, they stop even though all important things still remain uncomprehended. This is the reason why most people on Earth find it impossible to grasp the things that lay beyond their demise, the things that await them after they die. You must get used to the fact that your consciousness is immortal.